10 Free Online Coding Classes for Beginners | The Muse

Nowadays, knowing how to code isn’t just for people with computer science degrees. Sure, if you want to land a job as a software engineer, having a wealth of experience is key (and you’ll definitely need more than one online class). But for everyone else, there are plenty of reasons you should learn to code, too.

For example, a programming class can teach you enough to mock up a very basic website design or an app you have an idea for. Or, in certain industries, coding chops can impress the hiring manager—even if it’s not a part of your job. A little bit of knowledge lets them know that you understand current trends, that you’re proactive and curious, that you’ll be able to communicate with colleagues and clients about the technical aspects, and that—just maybe—you might be able to pitch in on bigger projects.

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I’ve convinced you, haven’t I? Good, because these 10 beginner classes are truly worth your time (and did I mention they’re free?).

Deciding to learn a programming language can seem pretty daunting. That’s why this course is a good place to begin your journey—it’s for total beginners and it’ll walk you through basic programming and computing concepts you’ll build on as you learn to code.

Length: 10 hours

Here’s another intro course for someone looking to learn the basics of coding and gain some background knowledge before digging in a bit deeper. Skillshare offers a free seven-day trial and, at 11 hours, this course should fit into that time just fine.

If you have more time on that free trial and have an app idea? Check out Learn Flutter and Build Android & iOS Apps From Scratch for an app-building class for beginners.

Length: 11 hours

Did you know you can learn to code using Excel? Yup—it’s actually a great and easy way to introduce yourself to programming, because you already know how to use it!

And, if you don’t have Excel on your computer, try using Google Apps Script and Google Sheets for free.

Length: 2 hours

Knowing how to build a website can make your life so much easier if you ever want to launch a side gig. This class will walk you through the process and HTML and CSS, step by step.

Length: 3 hours

Codecademy’s a great place to start to learn JavaScript—with the website’s hands-on approach to coding, you’ll pick it up in no time.

Length: 12 lessons, 12 projects

If you want to expand your website-building skills, PHP is a great next language after HTML and CSS.

Length: 10.5 hours, 156 lectures

According to Codecademy, Python’s not only a commonly-used language, but one of the easiest to read. In other words, it just might be a great place to start. Note that Python 2 is a version of the language—this is still a beginner course!

Length: 20 lessons, 8 projects

If you’re more of a visual learner, Udemy has plenty of great courses for you—including this basic Python tutorial.

Length: 2 hours

How about learning Python from a real university professor? (Note that this one’s free without the certification.)

Length: 11 hours

And once you finish all those languages, try Ruby on Rails to take your skill set to the next level.

Length: 3 lessons, 6 projects

For more options (or to learn a different type of skill entirely) check our roundup of the best sites for taking online classes.

Alyse Kalish

Previously an editor for The Muse, Alyse is proud to prove that yes, English majors can change the world. She’s written almost 500 articles for The Muse on anything from productivity tips to cover letters to bad bosses to cool career changers, many of which have been featured in Fast Company, Forbes, Inc., CNBC's Make It, USA Today College, Lifehacker, Mashable, and more. She calls many places home, including Illinois where she grew up and the small town of Hamilton where she attended Colgate University, but she was born to be a New Yorker. In addition to being an avid writer and reader, Alyse loves to dance, both professionally and while waiting for the subway.

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