10 Psychology Courses Psych Majors Should Take

Psychology Electives You Chould Take

Beyond the general education and departmental requirements, you can then take elective courses based on your interests. Most psychology programs also require a minimum number of psychology electives in order to graduate.

During your first year or two of college, you should concentrate on taking the required general education and major classes. If you end up filling your schedule with elective courses during the early years of your college education, you may find yourself scrambling to play catch up during your junior and senior years.

By saving most of your electives for the third and fourth year, you'll be able to enjoy some fun and interesting courses when many of your required program courses are starting to get tougher and more challenging.

Electives for Psychology Majors

Many students choose to take elective courses that are related to their future career goals. For example, a student with an interest in consumer psychology might focus on electives in areas like marketing, advertising, social psychology, experimental design, and statistics.

Other students might opt to take some elective courses in psychology along with classes in other interest areas. For example, a student interested in pursuing a career in art therapy might take fine arts classes as part of her undergraduate electives.

Some of the electives that might be of interest to psychology majors include courses in:

  • Sociology
  • Public affairs
  • Social work
  • Anthropology
  • Communications
  • Criminal justice
  • Biology
  • Health sciences
  • History
  • English composition
  • Statistics
  • Political science
  • Philosophy

As you choose electives, think about how these courses relate to your career goals.

If you plan on being a research psychologist, classes in statistics, writing, and research methods would prove particularly useful. On the other hand, if you're thinking of a career in mental health, courses in biology and health sciences might be the most beneficial.

Talk to Your Advisor

Whether you are earning a BA or BS in psychology, selecting the classes that are right for your academic plan is important. This is why it is so important to talk to your academic advisor. Your advisor can inform you about specific university requirements, as well as make additional suggestions based on your major, interests, and goals.

A good idea is to make a four-year academic plan outlining the courses that you would like to take each semester. This not only ensures that you meet all of the requirements of your degree program, but it also allows you to see where you can schedule in elective courses.

A Word From Verywell

College is a time to prepare for your future and explore your academic interests. Consider your future plans when picking classes. If you are thinking that you might want to go to graduate school, research which classes you will probably need to take in order to apply to these programs. Taking a hard look at the different classes you will need now and in the future may help you determine if going to graduate school in psychology is the right choice for you.

While you should certainly focus on your core courses first and foremost, you should plan on scheduling at least a few elective courses in order to get the minimum credits needed to graduate.

Elective courses are an excellent way to learn more about new subjects and broaden your education, so spend some time browsing through your school's course catalog to familiarize yourself with what is available.