USC First Year Abroad Courses | The American University of Paris

USC transferable coursework at AUP – Fall 2022

Updated:  11 May 2022

 

GE CATEGORY A:  THE ARTS  (1 course required for graduation from USC)

Please note that some Category A courses also count towards Category H. In this case, credit is earned for both categories.

 

 

AH 2000 – PARIS THROUGH ITS ARCHITECTURE I CCI 4 credits

Investigates the growth patterns of Paris from Roman times through the Second Empire. Studies major monuments, pivotal points of urban design, and vernacular architecture on site. Presents the general vocabulary of architecture, the history of French architecture and urban planning, as well as a basic knowledge of French history to provide a framework for understanding the development of Paris.

Course Fee: 20

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

FM 1010 – MODERN FILMS & THEIR MEANINGS CCI 4 credits

How do contemporary films make meaning? How does cinematic language convey emotion and raise ideas? how do we, as contemporary spectators, relate to and make sense of the screen? This course, while centered on contemporary films, is an introduction to cinematic language, its techniques, and the social and cultural factors that have made it one of the most influential art forms of our time. Looking at international films from just the last 20 years, we will explore and discover the ways these films creatively explore ideas and look at the technological, economic and political forces that fuel their production. Together with readings and screenings, individual and group assignments will help students deepen their understanding of lectures, readings and films and develop new critical skills and aesthetic understanding.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

FM 1019 – PRINCIPLES OF VIDEO PRODUCTION CCDI 4 credits

This course is designed to give you strong technical and conceptual skills in video production. Video and the moving image are everywhere in our world and a solid understanding of how they work will help you use them to pursue questions about the world around you. This course will prepare you for future video work in film, journalism, media and communications, studio art, and can be useful across many other disciplines on campus. You will learn to use the camera to raise questions and will work on several projects, each challenging you to explore new skills. Class time will be divided into lecture, screenings, in-class labs and critique. Outside class readings, shooting, editing and screenings will deepen your understanding.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

FM 2083 – SCORSESE & KUBRICK  4 credits

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. By the end of the course students should be able to analyze film in the American tradition
  2. Explore the system in which American films are produced and how this principally commercial enterprise affects style and content of films
  3. Gain an overview of the history of American cinema from 1945 to the present through the lens of these specific directors
  4. Learn basic ingredients of narrative film story-telling and the relations of story, plot and structure to time and memory in the filmmaking process
  5. Think comparatively and critically about the tensions between the studio system and the auteur

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

FM 2076 – INTRO TO HISTORY OF NARRATIVE FILM II CCI 4 credits

Analyzes classical Hollywood style from the 1940s onwards, looking at the work of some of the masters of the American system including Welles, Wyler, and Hitchcock. Studies postwar Hollywood genres including: film noir, the musical, the comedy, the Western, the gangster film, and sci-fi films. Traces important directions of postwar European Art Cinema (in particular Italian Neo-Realism and the Italian and French New Waves) and offers a brief overview of ‘new' cinemas worldwide.

Explores the important developments that have taken place in Hollywood from the 1960s through to the present covering topics such as: New Hollywood cinema, the auteur renaissance of the seventies and eighties, neo-noir in the nineties, the digital age, and contemporary cinema.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

FM 2090 – FILM NOIR  4 credits

Studies America's cinematic myth: Film Noir, a pessimistic style appearing in Hollywood in the 1940s. Films include: The Maltese Falcon, Shadow of a Doubt, The Big Sleep, Double Indemnity, The Postman Always Rings Twice, Touch of Evil, Out of the Past, The Woman in the Window, Murder My Sweet, Force of Evil, Pickup on South Street, and Kiss Me Deadly.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts

 

AH 1003 – INTRO TO ART THROUGH PARIS MUSEUMS CCI 4 credits

Uses the unsurpassed richness of the art museums of Paris as the principal teaching resource. The history of Western Art is studied through the close examination of a limited selection of major works in a variety of media. The works chosen illuminate the political, social and religious contexts of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Baroque and Rococo periods, and the modern epoch. The course has an extra course fee of 35 euros.

Course Fee: 35

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

AH 1020 – INTRO TO WESTERN ART II CCI 4 credits

Continues the study of the most significant monuments of Western painting, sculpture, and architecture, from the Renaissance to the 20th-century. Emphasizes historical context, continuity, and critical analysis. Includes direct contact with works of art in Parisian museums.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

AH 2011 – ANCIENT ART & ARCHITECTURE CCI 4 credits

Introduces first the specific contributions of Greek art to the Western tradition. Then presents the diversification of these achievements in the Etruscan civilization and in the Hellenistic age. Examines how the Romans absorbed, continued, and creatively transformed Greek and Etruscan art and passed the ancient heritage on to medieval and early modern Europe.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

AH 2013 – RENAISSANCE ART & ARCHITECTURE CCI 4 credits

Surveys notable developments in painting, sculpture, and architecture in Italy and in Northern Europe (late 13th-16th centuries). Emphasizes the origins of the Renaissance and the basic stylistic evolution from Early to High Renaissance and Mannerism. Explores the ramifications of the Italian Renaissance mode as it came into contact with other historical and cultural traditions in Northern Europe.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY A: The Arts & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

GE CATEGORY B:  HUMANISTIC INQUIRY (2 courses required for graduation from USC)

Please note that some Category B courses also count towards Category H. In this case, credit is earned for both categories.

 

 

PL 2003 – POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY CCI 4 credits

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry

 

PO 2003 – POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY CCI 4 credits

Political philosophy forms that branch of philosophy that reflects on the specificity of the political. Why are humans, as Aristotle argued, political animals? How are they political? What are the means and ends of the political, and how best does one organize the political with such questions in mind? The course offers a topic-oriented approach to the fundamental problems underlying political theory and practice.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry

 

CL 1025 – THE WORLD, THE TEXT, AND THE CRITIC I CCI 4 credits

Considers closely three moments when the practice of writing changed radically in response to historical and cultural processes, from Ancient Greece to 1800 (specific contents change each year). Investigates the forces that inform creative imagination and cultural production. Places those moments and those forces within a geographical and historical map of literary production, and introduces the tools of literary analysis.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

HI 1001 – HISTORY OF WESTERN CIV. UP TO 1500  4 credits

Surveys the development of Western civilization and culture, from the ancient civilizations of the Levant, Greece, and Rome, through the Middle Ages to the Renaissance.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

HI 1002 – HISTORY OF WESTERN CIV. FROM 1500  4 credits

Continues History 1001, from the Renaissance and the Reformation through commercialism, Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution and the industrial and social revolutions of the 19th century to nationalism and socialism in the contemporary Western world.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

HI 2041 – AMERICAN CIVILIZATION: ORIGINS TO 1877  4 credits

Discusses the history of the British colonies in North America and the United States in terms of economic development and social and cultural evolution. Contrasts the emergence of a unique American civilization with the internal debate over opposing conceptions that deteriorated into sectional strife. Themes include the genesis of a peculiarly American mentality, race relations, economic development, and social conflict.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

PL 1100 – HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY I: FROM ANCIENT TO MEDIEVAL CCI 4 credits

This course offers an overview of ancient and medieval philosophy. Beginning with the earliest Greek philosophers and ending with the late medieval founding fathers of modern scientific thought, we will read and discuss various answers these thinkers gave to questions such as: 'What is a good life?' or 'How can I reconcile my faith with what reason tells me?' Readings include Parmenides, Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, Seneca, Plotinus, Anselm, Avicenna, Abelard, Maimonides, Thomas Aquinas and Nicolaus of Autrecourt.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

PO 2041 – AMERICAN CIVILIZATION: ORIGINS TO 1877  4 credits

Discusses the history of the British colonies in North America and the United States in terms of economic development and social and cultural evolution. Contrasts the emergence of a unique American civilization with the internal debate over opposing conceptions that deteriorated into sectional strife. Themes include the genesis of a peculiarly American mentality, race relations, economic development, and social conflict.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY B: Humanistic Inquiry & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

GE CATEGORY C:  SOCIAL ANALYSIS (2 courses required for graduation from USC)

Please note that some Category C courses also count towards Category G. In this case, credit is earned for both categories.

 

 

AN 1002 – SOCIO-CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY CCI 4 credits

Sociocultural anthropology is the comparative study of human societies and cultures.  This course is designed to introduce students to central areas of anthropological inquiry, a range of key theoretical perspectives and the discipline’s holistic approach.  Through field-based research projects, students will also gain familiarity with the discipline’s qualitative research methods (especially participant observation).   While students will encounter the works of key historical figures in the discipline, they will also discover current debates on globalization and transnationalism.   Finally, this course also strives to cultivate students’ ability to reflect critically on their own identities and cultures, thereby gaining a greater understanding and appreciation for diversity and an improved set of intercultural communication skills.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

CL 2006 – CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST THEORY CCI 4 credits

Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

GS 2006 – CONTEMPORARY FEMINIST THEORY CCI 4 credits

Introduces the methodology of Gender Studies and the theory upon which it is based. Examines contemporary debates across a range of issues now felt to be of world-wide feminist interest: sexuality, reproduction, production, writing, representation, culture, race, and politics. Encourages responsible theorizing across disciplines and cultures.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

GS 2010 – INTRODUCTION TO GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND SOCIETY CCI 4 credits

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

PO 1011 – FOUNDATIONS OF MODERN POLITICS CCR 4 credits

What is politics – the quest for the common good or who gets what, when, and how? We study what defines politics in the modern age: states and nations in the international system, collective action and representation in mass societies, trajectories of democracy and dictatorship, politics and development in the context of capitalism. The course will introduce the student to the concerns, the language and the methods of Political Science.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

PO 2012 – INTRO TO POLIT'L GEOGRAPHY & GEOPOLITICS  4 credits

This course investigates how political processes shape human geography and, conversely, how assumptions about places underpin world politics. It presents the main theories of political geography, as well as essential concepts and terminology. It points to the historical contingency of political identities and organizations and reveals how major world events as well as spaces are shaped by everyday politics.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

PY 2010 – INTRODUCTION TO GENDER, SEXUALITY, AND SOCIETY CCI 4 credits

Surveys major issues concerning gender and the science of psychology in an attempt to answer the question: why is there such a gender gap when women and men share more psychological similarities than differences? Topics include: developmental processes and gender; gender roles and stereotypes, biology and gender; cross-cultural perspectives of gender; social-cultural theories of gender; language and gender, emotions and gender, health and gender.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis

 

LW 2030 – INTRO. TO HISTORY, LAW & SOCIETY  4 credits

What role does law play in shaping society? How have courts shaped society, both domestically and internationally? What strategies have people taken to resist unjust laws? Students engage in weekly moot courts that survey gripping historical and contemporary cases, including fugitive slave laws, the death penalty and criminal justice, hate speech, transgender rights, and issues relating to immigration, including asylum and deportation. Readings come from history, literature, sociology, and legal opinions. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply critical approaches to the law to contemporary issues; perform a mock trial, from start to finish; and write persuasive and analytically rigorous papers that demonstrate interdisciplinary thinking.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis & CATEGORY G: Citizenship in a Global Era

 

PO 2031 – WORLD POLITICS  4 credits

This course analyses the basic setting, structure and dynamics of world politics with emphasis on current global problems, practices and processes. In doing so, it introduces the major theoretical approaches to international politics, and uses theory as a methodological tool for analyzing sources of change and causes of conflict and/or cooperation in the global arena.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis & CATEGORY G: Citizenship in a Global Era

 

HI 2030 – INTRO. TO HISTORY, LAW & SOCIETY  4 credits

What role does law play in shaping society? How have courts shaped society, both domestically and internationally? What strategies have people taken to resist unjust laws? Students engage in weekly moot courts that survey gripping historical and contemporary cases, including fugitive slave laws, the death penalty and criminal justice, hate speech, transgender rights, and issues relating to immigration, including asylum and deportation. Readings come from history, literature, sociology, and legal opinions. By the end of this course, students will be able to apply critical approaches to the law to contemporary issues; perform a mock trial, from start to finish; and write persuasive and analytically rigorous papers that demonstrate interdisciplinary thinking.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY C: Social Analysis & CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations & CATEGORY G: Citizenship in a Global Era

 

GE CATEGORY E:  PHYSICAL SCIENCES (1 course required for graduation from USC)

 

 

SC 1070 – THE OCEAN ENVIRONMENT CCS 4 credits

This course is an introduction of the science of oceanic environment, from submarine canyons to zooplankton, from global warming to the growing plastics problem in mid oceanic gyres, from acidification to wave dynamics. We will explain oceanography's most important concepts and debunk its widely (and wildly) held misconceptions.

Corequisite: SC1070LLAB AND (MA1020CCM OR MA1020GE120 OR MA1005CCM OR MA1005GE120 OR MA1030CCM OR MA1030GE120 OR MA1091CCM OR MA1091GE120 OR ELECMA-30)

Course Fee: 19

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY E: Physical Sciences

USC Course Equivalency: GEOL107

 

SC 1055 – TOPICS: BIODIVERSITY CCS 4 credits

The Earth is changing. It has been constantly changing since before the origin of Life, but at the present it seems to be changing much faster than ever before. So fast that hundreds, probably thousands, of species become extinct every year because their habitats are being dramatically altered. So fast that teenagers all over the planet are organizing "strikes 4 Climate". So fast, that even politicians are starting to think about doing something about it.

Exponential technological development during the last century, together with the concentration of the world’s human population in these artificial environments that we call cities, have led us to believe that we are independent from the environment. However, in the context of global change, the general public is “re-discovering” that the human species actually depends on the proper functioning of ecosystems and on the services they provide. Our survival depends on biodiversity and its conservation.

The term biodiversity (or biological diversity) is commonly used in newspapers, in political debates, and even in social media. But, what is it? The extent and complexity of the study of biodiversity makes necessary an interdisciplinary approach that mixes biological, political, social and economic sciences. Nevertheless, at the present there seems to be a general consensus about the great value of biodiversity, and its conservation has become a global priority. Those with a solid background in this field and the skills to identify strategies to preserve diversity from new perspectives are professionals in demand.

This broad course will provide an overview of biological diversity and will place it in an evolutionary and ecological context. The course will also focus on the conservation and management of biodiversity, from social, economic, and political perspectives. During the semester, we will answer questions such as: Why is biodiversity important? How do species evolve or become extinct?

Prerequisite: Must be taken in the same semester with SC 1091L to count toward the Core Curriculum’s Experimental Reasoning Course with Lab (CCS) requirement

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY E: Physical Sciences

 

GE CATEGORY F:  QUANTITATIVE REASONING (1 course required for graduation from USC)

 

 

MA 1005 – MATH FOR LIFE CCM 4 credits

A General Education course designed for students majoring in subjects not requiring math skills, and those who dislike math. Projects are developed from a range of everyday situations: banking, the stock market, gambling, and even art. Meeting alternately in the classroom and the computer lab to develop mathematical models, students will develop quantitative reasoning, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. MA1005 CCM is not open to students who have taken MA1020 (Statistics) or above, and students cannot receive credit for MA 1005 if they have received credit for previously taking (either at AUP or transferred in) any math higher than or equivalent to MA 1005 CCM Math for Life.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning

 

MA 1020 – APPLIED STATISTICS I CCM 4 credits

Introduces the tools of statistical analysis. Combines theory with extensive data collection and computer-assisted laboratory work. Develops an attitude of mind accepting uncertainty and variability as part of problem analysis and decision-making. Topics include: exploratory data analysis and data transformation, hypothesis-testing and the analysis of variance, simple and multiple regression with residual and influence analyses.

Corequisite: MA0900 OR MA1005CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-25 OR ELECMA-30 OR ELECMA-20 OR MA1025CCM

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning

USC Course Equivalency: MATH114

 

MA 1025 – FUNCTIONS, MODELING, PRECALC CCM 4 credits

Functions Modeling Change provides the algebraic and geometric skills needed to succeed in a Calculus course. The central topic is functions (in particular linear, polynomial, exponential and logarithmic), function notation and graphs, transformations, composition and inverses.  Students also work with computers building mathematical models based on these functions, and implemented using graphing calculators, mathematical software and Excel.

Corequisite: MA0900 OR MA1020CCM OR ELECMA-25 OR ELECMA-30

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning

 

MA 1030 – CALCULUS I CCM 4 credits

Introduces differential and integral calculus. Develops the concepts of calculus as applied to polynomials, logarithmic, and exponential functions. Topics include: limits, derivatives, techniques of differentiation, applications to extrema and graphing; the definite integral; the fundamental theorem of calculus, applications; logarithmic and exponential functions, growth and decay; partial derivatives. Appropriate for students in the biological, management, computer and social sciences.

Prerequisite: MA1025CCM OR ELECMA-30 OR MA1025GE120

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning

USC Course Equivalency: MATH125

 

EC 2010 – PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS  4 credits

Focuses on the role played by relative market prices in our society and on the forces of market supply and demand in determining these prices. Since the actions of consumers and firms underlie supply and demand, the course studies in detail the behavior of these two groups.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning & ECON203

 

EC 2020 – PRINCIPLES OF MACROECONOMICS  4 credits

Examines the determinants of the levels of national income, employment, rates of interest, and prices. Studies in detail the instruments of monetary and fiscal policy, highlighting the domestic and international repercussions of their implementation.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY F: Quantitative Reasoning & ECON205

 

GE CATEGORY G:  CITIZENSHIP IN A DIVERSE WORLD

 

 

PO 1012 – CHALLENGES OF GLOBAL POLITICS  4 credits

This course examines key analytical and normative challenges of the present: global rebalancing and the emergence or reemergence of postcolonial states, uneven development, the role of culture in world politics, the future of the nation state, the global environmental imperative, mass forced and free migrations, the new landscape of armed conflict, the sources and implications of sharpening social divides, and the challenges to liberal-democratic theory and practice.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY G: Citizenship in a Global Era

 

EC 2091 – TOPICS: ECONOMICS AND POLITICS OF INEQUALITY  4 credits

Courses on different and emerging topics in the discipline, enriching the present course offerings. These classes are taught by permanent or visiting faculty.
This course provides an introduction to the analysis of economic and political inequalities and the interplay between these inequalities and development.

The course first introduces students with the concept of inequality—both vertical (between individuals and households) and horizontal (between groups). It then looks at different types of inequality (economic, social, and political) and how these inequalities affect individual and social welfare.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY G: Citizenship in a Global Era

 

GE CATEGORY H:  TRADITIONS AND HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS (1 course required for graduation from USC)

Please note that some Category A and Category B courses also count towards Category H. In this case, credit is earned for both categories.

 

 

HI 1015 – HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST I  4 credits

This course surveys major themes in the ancient (pre-Islamic) and medieval history of the Middle East. It is organized around two parts.  The first surveys successive civilizations and empires that rose in the region or invaded and dominated it, from the Egyptians, the Assyrians, the Babylonians, the Hittites, the Phoenicians, the Persians, to the Greeks and the Romans/Byzantines. The birth of Judaism and Christianity is presented in this part.  The Second covers the rise of Islam, its expansion and the Caliphate it established from the 7th to the late 13th century, when the Mongol seized Bagdad.

USC General Education Note: CATEGORY H: Traditions and Historical Foundations

 

LOWER DIVISION WRITING REQUIREMENT

 

 

EN 2020 – WRITING & CRITICISM CCE 4 credits

A series of topic-centered courses refining the skills of academic essay writing, studying a wide range of ideas as expressed in diverse literary genres and periods. Introduces the analysis of literary texts and gives training in the writing of critical essays and research papers. Recent topics include: Utopia and Anti-Utopia, City as Metaphor, Portraits of Women, Culture Conflict, and Labyrinths.

Prerequisite: EN1010

USC Course Equivalency: LOWER DIVISION WRITING REQUIREMENT (WRIT 130)

 

COURSES EARNING FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL EQUIVALENCIES AT USC

 

 

AB 1010 – ELEMENTARY ARABIC I  4 credits

This course is designed to familiarize beginners with the Arabic alphabet system and Arabic writing as well as provide the basis for limited conversation.

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 1

 

IL 1010 – ELEMENTARY ITALIAN I  4 credits

Introduces the Italian language with emphasis upon speaking, basic grammatical structure, with a particular focus on culture. Videos, CDs, plus a field trip to Venice, make this class an enjoyable challenge.

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 1

 

LT 1001 – ELEMENTARY LATIN I  4 credits

This is a Latin course for beginners. By reading simple Latin texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Latin yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic passive vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Medieval Latin, is possible.

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 1

 

GK 1005 – ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK I  4 credits

This is a course for beginners. By reading simple ancient Greek texts and trying to write (or, if you like, speak) some Greek yourself, you learn the first grammar essentials and acquire a basic vocabulary of c. 1000 words. Choice of a particular textbook and specialization on particular aspects, e.g. Greek for students of philosophy, is possible.

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 1

 

LT 1002 – ELEMENTARY LATIN II  4 credits

This course continues Elementary Latin I. At the end of the course you will have an overview of Latin grammar and a basic passive vocabulary of c. 2000 words. You will learn how to write simple Latin texts yourself and start to read excerpts of original literature. Specialization on certain classes of texts, e.g., Latin inscriptions, is possible.

Prerequisite: LT1001 OR LT1001CCI OR LT1001GE100

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 2

 

GK 1006 – ELEMENTARY ANCIENT GREEK II  4 credits

This course continues Elementary Ancient Greek I. At the end of the course you will have an overview of the grammar and a basic vocabulary of c. 2000 words. You will learn how to write simple Greek texts yourself and start to read excerpts of original literature. Specialization on certain classes of texts, e.g. Greek tragedies, is possible.

Prerequisite: GK1005 OR GK1005CCI OR GK1005GE100

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 2

 

AB 1030 – INTERMEDIATE ARABIC I  4 credits

After studying the principles of morphological derivation which makes the students able to structure their understanding of the vocabulary production system, the course focuses on producing small texts expressing the students’ opinion and description of the material seen during the sessions. AB 530 gives the opportunity to go beyond simple contact and to interact in Arabic within the fields covered by the different documents. The field covered by the didactic documents broadens out to short authentic texts, short articles and literary production, as well as authentic documents such as letters, cards, advertisings, announcements…

Prerequisite: AB1020

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 3 & MDES222

 

GK 2005 – INTERMEDIATE ANCIENT GREEK I  4 credits

Revision and expansion of the skills acquired at the Elementary level and review of grammar knowledge. The main goal at this level is to gain fluency in reading. Texts will be selected according to the interests or needs of the student.

Prerequisite: GK1006 OR GK1006CCI OR GK1006GE100

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 3 & GR 220

 

LT 2001 – INTERMEDIATE LATIN I  4 credits

Revision and expansion of the skills acquired at the Elementary level and review of grammar knowledge. The main goal at this level is to gain fluency inreading. Texts will be selected according to the interests or needs of the student.

Prerequisite: LT1002CCI OR LT1002GE100 OR LT1002

USC Course Equivalency: FOREIGN LANGUAGE LEVEL 3 & LAT 222

 

PREREQUISITE FOR LOWER DIVISION WRITING REQUIREMENT

Please note that this course is only if a student does not test directly into EN 2020. EN 2020 can then be taken in the Spring.

 

 

EN 1010 – COLLEGE WRITING  4 credits

Taught through thematically-linked works of literature from the Ancient world to the present day. Stresses expository writing, accurate expression, and logical organization of ideas in academic writing. Recent themes include: Childhood, Friendship from Aristotle to Derrida, Social Organization and Alienation, Monstrosity, and Music and Literature. This course satisfies only 4 credits of the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

THE FOLLOWING COURSES HAVE ALSO BEEN APPROVED BY USC FOR TRANSFER (RECEIVING OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT):

All earn Open Elective credit at USC except for CM 1023. This course has a direct course-to-course equivalency, so it will transfer to USC as a specific course. It will not earn GE credit.

 

 

AN 3060 – THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD  4 credits

This course examines the intersection of food and the senses from an anthropological perspective. We will explore the intersection between food and culture; the impact of social, political and economic contexts on our foods and foodways; French food culture; and taste, cuisine and commensality as forms of inter-cultural communication. Students apply class readings and practice ethnographic methodologies in a few short study trips.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1010 – INTRO TO DRAWING CCI 4 credits

This studio course provides an introduction to the basic ideas and techniques needed for the comprehension and construction of the built environment. Starting with elemental design concerns, students will be asked to use what they learn in order to create ever larger and more complex entities. Site-specific assignments making use of Paris and its history will oblige the students to engage in the “conversation” of the urban world.

Course Fee: 62

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1015 – PAINTING I CCI 4 credits

For students with little or no previous experience in drawing or painting. First analyzes still life objects in basic plastic terms starting with value. Concentrates during each class session on a new painterly quality until a sufficient visual vocabulary is achieved so that more complicated subjects such as the nude can be approached. Work will be done in oil.May be taken twice for credit.

Course Fee: 52

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1020 – MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES OF THE MASTERS CCI 4 credits

Techniques of the Masters Lectures, demonstrations, and workshops focus on materials and techniques used by artists over the centuries. Studies the historical background of techniques of drawing, painting, sculpture, and the graphic arts combined with a hands-on approach so that each student can experience the basic elements of the plastic arts.Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course. May be taken twice for credit.

Course Fee: 52

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1032 – INTRO TO SCULPTURE CCI 4 credits

For students who have little or no previous experience. Students learn how to see in three dimensions and work from observation. Mastery of structure and the architecture of form in space are acquired by the building up technique in clay. Work from plaster copies, nude models (male and female), and imagination are followed by an introduction to the carving technique. There is an additional fee in this course for materials.

Course Fee: 100

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1040 – PRINTMAKING I CCI 4 credits

This course focuses on traditional relief printing techniques for the creation of multiple identical images without the use of a printing press. Once the fundamentals are understood, experimentation is encouraged so that each student can learn how to best exploit the different methods to successfully translate sketches into a powerful printed document. In addition to the making of prints, students will study the history of woodblock and metal printing and will be asked to visit and write about several print collections.

Course Fee: 42

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR 1061 – DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY CCI 4 credits

This introductory course is an exploration of both technical and aesthetic concerns in photography. Using a digital camera, students will produce original work in response to a series of lectures, assignments, and bi-weekly critique classes. The course will cover the fundamentals of photographing with digital SLR’s, and students will learn a range of digital tools including color correction, making selections, working with layers and inkjet printing. After mastering the basics, students will work towards the completion of a final project and the focus of the remaining classes will be on critiques. Students will be asked to make pictures that are challenging in both content and form and express the complex and poetic nature of the human experience.Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Course Fee: 75

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

AR/CM 2080 – GRAPHIC DESIGN STUDIO  4 credits

In this course, students will be introduced to graphic design history and graphic design principles. They will learn to apply these principles through hands-on exercises and projects, using both analog means and digital tools (Adobe Photoshop). No prerequisites.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Developed overall design literacy: students will acquire and improve their skills, first using hands on “analogue” means, and then using design software (i.e. Photoshop) and learn to express their ideas effectively through visual means.
  2. Gained an appreciation for and an understanding of graphic design and its role in effective communication.
  3. Know the global history of graphic design and its major schools of thought.
  4. Learned essential design terminology and developed their ability to express verbally why a certain design is or is not effective, giving constructive advice on how a design can be improved.
  5. Produced a final project and portfolio of original design work, both hand-made and digitally produced.
  6. Developed overall design literacy: students will acquire and improve their skills, first using hands on “analogue” means, and then using design software (i.e. Photoshop) and learn to express their ideas effectively through visual means.
  7. Gained an appreciation for and an understanding of graphic design and its role in effective communication.
  8. Know the global history of graphic design and its major schools of thought."
  9. Learned essential design terminology and developed their ability to express verbally why a certain design is or is not effective, giving constructive advice on how a design can be improved.
  10. Produced a final project and portfolio of original design work, both hand-made and digitally produced.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 1020 – INTRODUCTION TO THE BUSINESS EXPERIENCE  2 credits

Teams of student-managers compete in an integrated, international business simulation designed to introduce them to business concepts. Students will manage a company operating in the international action-capture camera and drones markets. Using a hands-on experiential approach, teams make management, marketing, human resources, operations, finance and corporate social responsibility decisions that allow them to meet their firm’s objectives over ten fiscal years. Students are graded on company performance, and on individual and group analysis of the situation at hand. Please note this course has a fee.

Course Fee: 45

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 2001 – FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING  4 credits

This course introduces students to the financial accounting cycle and financial reporting for corporations. Students learn how to measure and record accounting data and prepare financial statements. At the end of the course, students choose a company and do an analysis of their financial statements, comparing their company against a competitor company, using financial ratios.

USC Course Equivalency: (CDP) OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 2002 – MANAGERIAL ACCOUNTING  4 credits

Provides a basic introduction to the concepts of accounting for purposes of management control and management decision-making. Topics include: budgeting, budget variance analysis, cost-volume-profit relationships, product cost accounting, segment reporting and differential analysis.

Prerequisite: BA2001

USC Course Equivalency: (CDP) OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 2020 – MANAGEMENT & ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOR CCI 4 credits

The course introduces students to basic Management/Organizational Behavior concepts and enables them to understand the attitude and behaviors on the individual level and the group level within organizations. Students will be enabled to use Organizational Behavior tools and theories to recognize organizational patterns within a complex social situation. Students will be provided with readings, lectures, and cases that provide a diverse and robust understanding of human interaction in organization.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 2040 – MARKETING IN A GLOBAL ENVIRONMENT  4 credits

This introductory marketing course develops students’ understanding of the principles of marketing and their use in international business. Students learn how to collect and analyze data sets to make marketing decisions with the goal of understanding customers wants, demands, and needs; they learn marketing from a strategic and functional point of view. With a focus on problem solving, students work in multicultural teams cultivating a greater sensitivity to cultural issues while improving communication skills. Students will consider marketing in the French, US, and international marketplace.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 3020 – ENTREPRENEURSHIP AND NEW VENTURES  4 credits

This course provides the student with the basic understanding of small business management and the activities required for the planning and creation of new enterprises. Entrepreneurial spirit, opportunity identification, new ventures selection, ownership options, legal and tax issues will be discussed. Students apply concepts such as a business plan and, most importantly, will develop a business model. Special attention is given to entrepreneurship in an international setting.

Prerequisite: College Level=Junior AND BA1020

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

BA 2050 – CREATIVITY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT CCX 4 credits

The course introduces the foundations of managing creativity and innovation. The readings and discussion will focus on the concepts and frameworks for analysing how firms create, commercialize and capture value from innovative products and services.

The aim of this course is to provide a solid grounding to students interested in managing creativity and the various aspects of the innovation process within organizations. The course is divided into two parts. The first part focuses mainly on the creativity process around three themes: What is creativity? How can creativity be stimulated? How can creative ideas be translated to innovative products and business strategies? Based on major theories in the field, we discuss whether monetary rewards enhance or undermine creativity, how multitasking or working under time pressure affects creativity, what tools we can provide to stimulate creativity, and the challenges that arise when implementing creative ideas in organizations. The second part of the course examines the organizational issues involved in innovating and in implementing innovations. These issues include management of teams and partnerships, learning within and across projects, the manager's role in funding, directing, and killing innovation projects, technological entrepreneurship, and resistance to innovation.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CL 2075 – THEATER IN PARIS  4 credits

This course essentially happens in the theatres of Paris, exploring the city’s fabulous resources, exchanging with practitioners and scholars from other institutions. We see ways of integrating music, dance and “physical theatre,” innovative explorations of classics from European and non-European traditions, avant-garde masters and the brightest young experimental troupes. We have theatre that directly questions political dilemmas, collective theatre and director-driven theatre, machine theatre and theatre based around great individual actors. Papers done in French or English.

Course fee atttached.

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CL 2100 – INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP CCR 4 credits

In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 1005 – INTRO TO WEB AUTHORING  2 credits

Introduces Web publishing in 12 sessions. Students will learn the basics of HTML and the use of at least one HTML editor. Site publishing including file structures, image and sound files will be covered.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 1011 – JOURNALISM: WRITING & REPORTING CCR 4 credits

The introductory course provides students with basic training in writing and reporting in all forms of journalism, print and online. The course gives students with a grounding in the basic principles and practices of the journalism profession: accuracy, fairness, objectivity. Students will learn journalistic writing techniques as well as style and tone. They will analyze possible sources, define angles, and learn to write a hard news story. The course will provide workshop training for students involved in ASM courses focused on the Peacock Plume website.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 1019 – PRINCIPLES OF VIDEO PRODUCTION CCDI 4 credits

This course is designed to give you strong technical and conceptual skills in video production. Video and the moving image are everywhere in our world and a solid understanding of how they work will help you use them to pursue questions about the world around you. This course will prepare you for future video work in film, journalism, media and communications, studio art, and can be useful across many other disciplines on campus. You will learn to use the camera to raise questions and will work on several projects, each challenging you to explore new skills. Class time will be divided into lecture, screenings, in-class labs and critique. Outside class readings, shooting, editing and screenings will deepen your understanding.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 1023 – INTRO TO MEDIA & COMMUNICATION STUDIES  4 credits

This course provides a survey of the media and its function in today’s society. It introduces students to the basic concepts and tools necessary to think critically about media institutions and practices. In addition to the analysis of diverse media texts, the course considers wider strategies and trends in marketing, distribution, audience formation and the consequences of globalization. By semester’s end, students will understand the basic structures of today’s media and be able to provide advanced analysis that weighs the social and political implications of its products.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE OR EN2020

USC Course Equivalency: COMM203

 

CM 1091 – TOPICS: AUDIO JOURNALISM PRACTICUM CCI 2 credits

Topics vary every semester

USC Course Equivalency: (PTN) OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 1110 – INTRODUCTION TO FASHION STUDIES  4 credits

This course aims to introduce students to the study of fashion, considered as a multidisciplinary field of analyses. At the intersection of theory and practice, and relying on the key texts of historians, art historians, philosophers, sociologists, anthropologists and geographers, this course will examine the relationship between fashion and body, identity, art, industry, media, class, culture, subculture, gender, sex, time, space, religion and politics. With an emphasis on experiential learning and drawing on visual and film sources, on historical and contemporary examples for discussion, this class will provide students with the possibility to question the future of the fashion industry by studying the social and environmental impact of fashion and the role of social change that fashion can play.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 2003 – MEDIA INDUSTRIES: STRATEGIES, MARKETS & CONSUMERS  4 credits

This course examines how the media industries – from movies and television to music and magazines – have been transformed by the disruptive impact of the Internet and new forms of consumer behavior. Economic terms such as “creative destruction” will help students understand how the Internet disrupted old media business models and shifted market power to consumers. Case studies include Apple’s impact on the music industry, the emergence of “streaming” services such as Netflix and Spotify, the decline of traditional print-based journalism with the emergence of online platforms, and Amazon’s transformation of the book industry.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 2004 – COMPARATIVE COMMUNICATIONS HISTORY  4 credits

This course provides historical background to understand how contemporary communication practices and technologies have developed and are in the process of developing and reflects on what communication has been in different human societies across time and place. It considers oral and literate cultures, the development of writing systems, of printing, and different cultural values assigned to the image. The parallel rise of mass media and modern western cultural and political forms and the manipulation and interplay of the properties and qualities conveyed by speech, sight, and sound are studied with reference to the printed book, newspapers, photography, radio, cinema, television, new media.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 2006 – MEDIA GLOBALIZATION  4 credits

What is globalization? Why study the media? What is the relationship between the media and globalization? What are the consequences of media globalization on our lives and identities? This course critically explores these questions and challenging issues that confront us today. Globalization can be understood as a multi-dimensional, complex process of profound transformations in all spheres – technological, economic, political, social, cultural, intimate and personal. Yet much of the current debates of globalization tend to be concerned with “out there” macro-processes, rather than what is happening “in here,” in the micro-processes of our lives. This course explores both the macro and the micro. It encourages students to develop an enlarged way of thinking – challenging existing paradigms and providing comparative perspectives.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR EN2020CCE

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 2051 – COMMUNICATION THEORY & RESEARCH METH. CCR 4 credits

The skills learned in this course will prepare students for upper-division communication courses, and provide students with basic research methods in the field of communication. Students will become familiar with a range of research methods (survey, interview, ethnography, discourse, and political economy.

Prerequisite: EN1000 OR EN1010 OR (EN2020 OR EN2020CCE)

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 2100 – INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE  4 credits

This course considers the construction of the visual world and our participation in it.  Through a transcultural survey of materials, contexts and theories, students will learn how visual practices relate to other cultural activities, how they shape identity and environmental basic ways, and how vision functions in correspondence with other senses.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CM 3060 – THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD  4 credits

This course examines the intersection of food and the senses from an anthropological perspective. We will explore the intersection between food and culture; the impact of social, political and economic contexts on our foods and foodways; French food culture; and taste, cuisine and commensality as forms of inter-cultural communication. Students apply class readings and practice ethnographic methodologies in a few short study trips.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CS 1005 – INTRO TO WEB AUTHORING  2 credits

Introduces Web publishing in 12 sessions. Students will learn the basics of HTML and the use of at least one HTML editor. Site publishing including file structures, image and sound files will be covered.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CS 1040 – INTRO TO COMPUTER PROGRAMMING I  4 credits

Introduces the field of computer science and the fundamental concepts of programming from an object-oriented perspective using the programming language Java. Starts with practical problem-solving and leads to the study and analysis of simple algorithms, data types, control structures, and use of simple data structures such as arrays and strings.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CS 1060 – DATA SCIENCE: METHODS AND CONTEXT CCDI 4 credits

This project-based course introduces data science by looking at the whole cycle of activities involved in data science projects. Students will learn how to think about problems with rigor and creativity, ethically applying data science skills to address those problems. The course project will address the theoretical, mathematical and computational challenges involved in data science.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Students will be able to perform simple data manipulations and visualizations using tools such as spreadsheets, geographical information systems and Python code.
  2. Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the processes involved in extracting meaning from data, in order to engage with complex issues from multiple perspectives. This includes showing critical knowledge of the potentials and limitations of data driven inquiry.
  3. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the ethical, legal, environmental, social and technical challenges related to data collection, storage, analysis and communication.
  4. Exploring and Engaging Difference: Students will think critically about cultural and social difference; they will identify and understand power structures that determine hierarchies and inequalities that can relate to race, ethnicity, gender, nationhood, religion, or class.
  5. Civic and Ethical Engagement: Students will demonstrate awareness of ethical considerations relating to specific societal problems, values, or practices (historical or contemporary; global or local) and learn to articulate possible solutions to prominent challenges facing societies and institutions today so as to become engaged actors at various levels in our interconnected world.
  6. Students will be able to perform simple data manipulations and visualizations using tools such as spreadsheets, geographical information systems and Python code.
  7. Students will demonstrate a good understanding of the processes involved in extracting meaning from data, in order to engage with complex issues from multiple perspectives. This includes showing critical knowledge of the potentials and limitations of data driven inquiry.
  8. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the ethical, legal, environmental, social and technical challenges related to data collection, storage, analysis and communication.
  9. Exploring and Engaging Difference: Students will think critically about cultural and social difference; they will identify and understand power structures that determine hierarchies and inequalities that can relate to race, ethnicity, gender, nationhood, religion, or class.
  10. Students will learn about privacy, security and data preservation issues.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

CS 2071 – LANGUAGES & DATA STRUCTURES  4 credits

Uses predefined classes and class libraries to introduce standard data structures (stacks, queues, sets, trees, and graphs). Studies and implements algorithms for string-searching, sorting, trees and graph traversals. Introduces algorithm complexity analysis and big-Oh (O,,) notation.

Prerequisite: CS1040GE110 OR CS1040

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

EC 2003 – MEDIA INDUSTRIES: STRATEGIES, MARKETS & CONSUMERS  4 credits

Studies the main characteristics of the 'New Economy' and explores the existing linkages between the digital media, technological innovation and the network economy in relation to the market in a national and international context.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PL 1300 – KNOWING WHY: FORMAL LOGIC AND CAUSAL REASONING CCI 4 credits

You will understand better why you and why others hold the beliefs they do. The course combines a complete introduction to propositional and predicate logic with an overview of types of causal reasoning. You will apply these new skills to analyze and engage with natural language arguments about philosophical topics and other controversial themes of the day.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

EN 1000 – PRINCIPLES OF ACADEMIC WRITING  4 credits

Emphasizes the stages required to produce a polished, articulate essay by practicing the necessary components of excellent academic writing: sharpening critical thinking skills, organizing ideas, choosing appropriate and dynamic words, varying prose style, editing, refining, and proofreading. Although this course carries 4 credits, it does not fulfill the University's English requirement.

Prerequisite: EN0950

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

EN 2100 – INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING: A CROSS-GENRE WORKSHOP CCR 4 credits

In this course, students practice writing fiction, creative nonfiction, and poetry while exploring the boundaries between genres. The workshop format includes guided peer critique of sketches, poems, and full-length works presented in class and discussion and analysis of literary models. In Fall, students concentrate on writing techniques. In Spring, the workshop is theme-driven. May be taken twice for credit.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FM 1010 – MODERN FILMS & THEIR MEANINGS CCI 4 credits

How do contemporary films make meaning? How does cinematic language convey emotion and raise ideas? how do we, as contemporary spectators, relate to and make sense of the screen? This course, while centered on contemporary films, is an introduction to cinematic language, its techniques, and the social and cultural factors that have made it one of the most influential art forms of our time. Looking at international films from just the last 20 years, we will explore and discover the ways these films creatively explore ideas and look at the technological, economic and political forces that fuel their production. Together with readings and screenings, individual and group assignments will help students deepen their understanding of lectures, readings and films and develop new critical skills and aesthetic understanding.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FM 1019 – PRINCIPLES OF VIDEO PRODUCTION CCDI 4 credits

This course is designed to give you strong technical and conceptual skills in video production. Video and the moving image are everywhere in our world and a solid understanding of how they work will help you use them to pursue questions about the world around you. This course will prepare you for future video work in film, journalism, media and communications, studio art, and can be useful across many other disciplines on campus. You will learn to use the camera to raise questions and will work on several projects, each challenging you to explore new skills. Class time will be divided into lecture, screenings, in-class labs and critique. Outside class readings, shooting, editing and screenings will deepen your understanding.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FM 2083 – SCORSESE & KUBRICK  4 credits

LEARNING OUTCOMES

  1. By the end of the course students should be able to analyze film in the American tradition
  2. Explore the system in which American films are produced and how this principally commercial enterprise affects style and content of films
  3. Gain an overview of the history of American cinema from 1945 to the present through the lens of these specific directors
  4. Learn basic ingredients of narrative film story-telling and the relations of story, plot and structure to time and memory in the filmmaking process
  5. Think comparatively and critically about the tensions between the studio system and the auteur

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 1100 – FRENCH AND CULTURE I  4 credits

This course is an introduction to French and is intended to help students acquire the basic elements of spoken and written French. Students will learn how to express themselves in everyday life situations. The students’ basic needs for linguistic and cultural information will be the main focus of this course. In class, work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the city of Paris.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 1200 – FRENCH AND CULTURE II CCF 4 credits

This course is a second semester Elementary French course, a continuation of level FR 1010 with emphasis on acquiring basic level of proficiency in the language and understanding the culture of France and the Francophone world. This course will enable students to improve their comprehension skills through the use of authentic audio and video material and to acquire vocabulary to face situations in their real life in Paris. The four language skills (listening, speaking, reading and writing) are reinforced and special emphasis is placed on pronunciation.In-class work will be supplemented by multimedia activities and real-life situations in the City of Paris.

Prerequisite: FR1100 OR FR1200 OR FR1200CCF

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 1300 – FRENCH AND CULTURE III CCI 4 credits

The aim of the course is to improve and widen the listening, speaking and writing skills of those taking it, consolidating their knowledge of the full range of basic grammatical structures and broadening their general range of vocabulary.  By the end of the course, students should have reached approximately the level A2 standard on the Common European Framework References for Languages

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI OR FR1200 OR FR1300

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 2075 – THEATER IN PARIS  4 credits

This course essentially happens in the theatres of Paris, exploring the city’s fabulous resources, exchanging with practitioners and scholars from other institutions. We see ways of integrating music, dance and “physical theatre,” innovative explorations of classics from European and non-European traditions, avant-garde masters and the brightest young experimental troupes. We have theatre that directly questions political dilemmas, collective theatre and director-driven theatre, machine theatre and theatre based around great individual actors. Taught in French. Papers done in French or English.

Course fee attached.

Prerequisite: FR1200CCF OR FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 2100 – FRENCH AND CULTURE IV CCI 4 credits

This course reviews basic and complex sentence patterns in greater depth through discussions on students experience in Paris. Cultural and historical aspects of the French life are introduced. Students will learn additional vocabulary to express opinions, beliefs, doubts and emotions, and are shown various language registers (formal/informal vocabulary and structures) and intonations. Examples are taken from real life situations, film, television, newspaper articles, etc.The four language skills (listening, reading, speaking, writing) will be reinforced.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR1300 OR FR2100 OR FR2100CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 2200 – FRENCH AND CULTURE V CCI 4 credits

This high intermediate course will allow students to reach the B1+ CEFR (DELF) competencies by reinforcing and expanding their ability to express themselves, defend an opinion, and debate with others. Special attention is paid to increasing students' ability to form complex sentences to express attitudes, wishes, necessity, doubt, emotions, to link ideas and to speculate. A B1.1 level in French or a passing grade in a French and Culture IV class (FR 2100) is required.

Spontaneously and through active workshops and discussion, they will react and express their point of view on contemporary subjects and questions, such as access to knowledge (university or other) for all, the gaze on information at a time of “fake news” and the over-multiplication of distribution channels (Internet, social networks, etc.), the representation of so-called “visible” minorities in the media sphere, or the consequences of global warming on countries and their inhabitants…

Through learning that is both individual and collective, debates on ideas based on their past and current experiences in and out of class, but also a constant questioning of their representations, students will thus be encouraged to develop, in addition to their linguistic and cultural skills, their critical thinking and to better understand contemporary issues.

Prerequisite: FR2100CCI OR FR2100 OR FR2200 OR FR2200CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

FR 2550 – ADV. GRAMMAR & COMPOSITION  4 credits

(formerly FR307 and FR2055)This course is designed for highly motivated students who plan to enroll in advanced French courses on campus or abroad. Heavy emphasis will be placed on individual work based on customized programs of study in chosen textbooks. Special attention will be given training on various forms of written French as well to a strengthening of the coherent structure of these writings.Class time will be devoted to analyzing the students’ trials and errors, through group discussions, review and quizzes. Taught in French.

Prerequisite: FR1300CCI OR FR2100CCI OR FR2200CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

GS 2045 – SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY CCI 4 credits

Studies the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Presents the basic fields of study that compose the science of social psychology, and how its theories impact on most aspects of people's lives. Topics of study include: conformity, persuasion, mass communication, propaganda, aggression, attraction, prejudice, and altruism.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

MA 2007 – OPERATIONS RESEARCH  4 credits

This course is intended to study the computational methodologies of Linear Programming and its variants and extensions, from the Transportation Problem and the Assignment Model to Network optimisation.

Various types of applications from the fields of Environmental Science (for the determination of the efficient use of scarce resources), Economics, Finance, Advertising… will be investigated and the methods by which useful results are obtainable – together with the reasoning behind the use of these methods  – will be discussed.

Both the mathematical aspects and the use of a software package will be highlighted, each approach reinforcing the other. All classes will be held in the computer lab so as to enhance understanding, favour an interactive approach and develop new insights.

Prerequisite: MA 1010 or above

Prerequisite: 3 Credits From Range [MA1010 To MA2041]

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

MA 2030 – CALCULUS II  4 credits

The continuation of MA1030, Calculus I. This course is appropriate for economics, mathematics, business and computer science majors and minors. Topics include: infinite series and applications; differential equations of first and second order and applications, functions of several variables, partial derivatives with applications, especially Lagrange multipliers. Includes the use of Mathematica.

Prerequisite: MA1030CCM

USC Course Equivalency: MUST BE TAKEN WITH MA 3030: MATH126 and MATH226

 

MA 2041 – LINEAR ALGEBRA  4 credits

Treats applications in economics and computer science, limited to Euclidean n-space. Topics include: the linear structure of space, vectors, norms and angles, transformations of space, systems of linear equations and their applications, the Gauss-Jordan method, matrices, determinants, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Uses Mathematica for graphics and algorithms.

Prerequisite: MA1030CCM OR MA1030GE120

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

ME 2035 – SITUATING THE MIDDLE EAST II  4 credits

This course covers the religious, cultural and linguistic diversities in the Middle East and North Africa. It exposes students to and familiarizes them with the origin of these diversities and traces its impact and influence on the modern Middle East. The Islamic identity of the region, its signifier, from the eyes of those outside the region is closely examined. The second part of the course turns to the rich linguistic and cultural diversities of the region, their origin, particularities, and their contributions to the identities of different groups. The role of linguistic diversity as both a unifying and a divisive force will be examined, and the region’s homogeneity and heterogeneity and the socio-political implications of cultural institutions are further explored through its literature, painting, calligraphy, food cultures and customs of dress.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PL 1300 – KNOWING WHY: FORMAL LOGIC AND CAUSAL REASONING CCI 4 credits

You will understand better why you and why others hold the beliefs they do. The course combines a complete introduction to propositional and predicate logic with an overview of types of causal reasoning. You will apply these new skills to analyze and engage with natural language arguments about philosophical topics and other controversial themes of the day.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PO 2050 – POLITICAL ANALYSIS  4 credits

This course examines the nature of knowledge claims in political science: how we know what we know and how certain we are. Research schools, the nature of description and explanation in political science, and basis issues of quantitative analysis will form the core elements of this course, while substantive themes may vary each year.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2009 – SHATTERED BRAINS, FRACTURED MINDS  4 credits

This course provides knowledge – but also provokes the student's knowledge on the mind-brain relationship. Phenomena in brain-damaged patients teach us how the brain creates our mind. We will talk about how memory, language, visual perception, but also social processes or the body image are represented in the brain. This course is not a standard neuropsychology course and is accessible for non-psychology students.

Prerequisite: PY1000CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2013 – UNDERSTANDING HUMAN DEVELOPMENT  4 credits

The course is an introduction to developmental psychology. From various points of view it explores the key question What is, and how can we understand, human development? It engages with central issues of developmental psychology (among others, through the work of influential psychologists such as Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, E. Erikson, Jerome Bruner, Katherine Nelson, Peggy J. Miller, and Michael Tomasello) and puts them into cross- and interdisciplinary contexts. These contexts include evolutionary theory; cultural and sociocultural, narrative, and critical psychology; history; anthropology; and philosophy. Beyond the scientific and conceptual domain, the course also investigates phenomena of human development in literature, arts, and film.

PY1000 is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2020 – RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY  4 credits

Students will learn the basics of doing experimental research in psychology, including the ethics of working with human subjects, researching ideas in the scholarly literature, and designing and interpreting research findings. The principles learned here apply in many domains where research is employed to describe and understand persons and social reality. MA1020 is recommended as a prerequisite.

Prerequisite: PY1000CCI

Corequisite: PY2020LLAB

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2022 – PERSONALITY & INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES  4 credits

Personality addresses central psychological questions on how persons think, feel and act. This course provides students with a solid foundation in the basics of theory and research in personality psychology. Students will be introduced to classic and contemporary perspectives in the field, continuing controversies and debates and the rationale and techniques for personality assessment. PY1000 is recommended as a prerequisite.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2043 – ABNORMAL & CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  4 credits

Examines the classification systems for abnormal behavior, using the DSM IV Multiaxial diagnostic system as the base for studying currently recognized major diagnostic categories. Uses an integrative biopsychosocial model to study the etiology of various psychological disorders as well as empirically supported treatment methods.

Prerequisite: PY1000CCI

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 2045 – SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY CCI 4 credits

Studies the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations. Presents the basic fields of study that compose the science of social psychology, and how its theories impact on most aspects of people's lives. Topics of study include: conformity, persuasion, mass communication, propaganda, aggression, attraction, prejudice, and altruism.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

SC 1020 – ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE CCS 4 credits

This course is intended to introduce non-scientists to key concepts and approaches in the study of the environment. With a focus on the scientific method, we learn about natural systems using case studies of disruptions caused by human activity. Topics include global warming, deforestation, waste production and recycling, water pollution, environmental toxins and sustainable development. The relationships between science and policy, the media, and citizen action are also addressed. Must take lab. Please note that an additional fee will be charged for this course.

Corequisite: SC1020LLAB AND (MA1005CCM OR MA1020CCM OR MA1025CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1091CCM OR ELECMA-30 OR CCMCCM OR MA1010)

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

SC 2010 – CONTEMPORARY ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES CCR 4 credits

This course will focus on anthropogenic environmental emergencies, such as global warming, habitat destruction, and the introduction of invasive species. Students will investigate specific cases discussed in recent peer-reviewed scientific articles, and will evaluate possible solutions to these crises from multiple perspectives.

Prerequisite: 4 Credits From Range [SC1020CCS To SC1090GE130] AND (MA1005CCM OR MA1020CCM OR MA1025CCM OR MA1030CCM OR MA1005GE120 OR MA1020GE120 OR MA1030GE120)

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

VC 2100 – INTRODUCTION TO VISUAL CULTURE  4 credits

This course considers the construction of the visual world and our participation in it.  Through a transcultural survey of materials, contexts and theories, students will learn how visual practices relate to other cultural activities, how they shape identity and environmental basic ways, and how vision functions in correspondance with other senses.

USC Course Equivalency: OPEN ELECTIVE CREDIT

 

PY 1000 – INTRO TO PSYCHOLOGY CCI 4 credits

This course discusses the intellectual foundations of contemporary psychology. Students learn about the concepts, theories and experiments basic to an understanding of the discipline, including classic thought and recent advances in psychology such as psychoanalysis, learning theory,biological mechanisms, developmental, social, cognitive, personality and abnormal psychology.

USC Course Equivalency: TR-PSYC

 

THE FOLLOWING COURSES DO NOT TRANSFER TO USC BUT ARE AVAILABLE TO USC PARTNER STUDENTS

IMPORTANT:  The following courses need to be taken along with four 4-credit courses that do transfer to USC (see all courses above).

 

 

AH 2018 – ART AND THE MARKET  4 credits

Investigates economic and financial aspects of art over several historical periods. Examines painting, sculpture, drawing, and decorative arts as marketable products, analyzing them from the perspective of patrons, collectors, investors, and speculators. Studies artists as entrepreneurs. Assesses diverse functions and forms of influence exercised by art market specialists: critics, journalists, public officials, auctioneers, museum professionals, experts, and dealers.

USC Course Equivalency: DOES NOT TRANSFER TO USC

 

BA 3030 – HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT CCR 4 credits

Offers a systematic analysis of human resource concepts and practices designed

to enhance organizational objectives and employee goals. Studies various aspects

of the employment relationship: job design, staffing, employee training and

development, diversity management, performance evaluation, compensation and

salary administration, employee and labor relations, and collective bargaining.

Examines contemporary and emerging human resource systems and models found in

the U.S., Europe, and Asia.

Prerequisite: BA2020CCI OR BA2020GE110

USC Course Equivalency: DOES NOT TRANSFER TO USC

 

CM 1850 – MAGAZINE JOURNALISM PRACTICUM CCX 2 credits

This workshop trains students in magazine writing and production through hands-on experience working on a high-quality student magazine, the Peacock. Students participate in a newsroom setting in a variety of roles — from writing and editing to pagination and layout — to produce the Peacock in both print and online versions. Students will learn researching and writing techniques as well as how to interview and source stories for magazines. They will gain pre-professional experience preparing them for entry-level positions in magazine journalism – whether print publications or online magazines. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree. May be taken twice for credit.

USC Course Equivalency: DOES NOT TRANSFER TO USC

 

CM 1852 – VIDEO JOURNALISM PRACTICUM CCX 2 credits

This hands-on workshop trains students in video journalism in a real-time newsroom and production studio setting. Students will gain skills working with video production equipment and editing tools including Final Cut Pro. Students will contribute video journalism pieces to “PTV”, the video platform linked to the student media website where their video work contributes to the content mix of news pieces, video work, and magazine stories.  Students will produce short video stories, narratives and interviews for the site. They will edit video pieces, post on YouTube, and use social media to promote their stories. The course will prepare students for entry-level positions in video journalism and for more advanced AUP courses in video and broadcast journalism. Note: Up to 8 credits for Journalism Practica can be applied toward the degree. May be taken twice for credit.

USC Course Equivalency: DOES NOT TRANSFER TO USC

 

MA 900 – INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA  2 credits

Intermediate Algebra is for students who need a review before proceeding further in mathematics. The class meets once per week. Topics include linear and quadratic equations, inequalities, graphs, polynomials, factoring, radical expressions, 2×2 systems of linear equations, integer exponents and scientific notation.

This course is worth 2 credits.

USC Course Equivalency: DOES NOT TRANSFER TO USC