Available Sophia Courses for Incoming First Year Students | Saint Mary's College, Notre Dame, IN

For First-Year Students Fall 2022

Knowledge Acquisition and Integration of Learning (LO1)

Literature

SOME COURSE DESCRIPTIONS BELOW HAVE BEEN EXPANDED TO PROVIDE MORE INFORMATION. FOR OFFICIAL COURSE DESCRIPTIONS REFER TO THE SAINT MARY’S COLLEGE BULLETIN.

ENLT 151 Latina Writers (3)
Our readings will include novels, poetry, drama, short stories, creative nonfiction, and graphic narrative by Latina writers and artists. These texts provide rich and varied representations of immigration, second-generation experiences, and the politics of Latina identity in America. More specifically, we will examine how these texts engage with issues surrounding ethnicity, culture, racialized discrimination, class, gender, and sexuality. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Intercultural Competence.

ENLT 151W Animals, Monsters, Ghosts (4)
This course introduces students to reading and writing about literature at the college level. Throughout the semester, we’ll practice skills necessary for literary analysis, including close reading, using textual evidence, and developing strong interpretive arguments. We’ll read short stories, novels, poetry, and drama with a focus the powerful animals, strange monsters, and terrifying ghosts that populate American literature. We’ll ask: Why are powerful nonhuman beings so common in American literature? How do authors use nonhuman elements to shape their narratives? How might these representations be significant? This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices, provides students the opportunity to earn the W and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

ENLT 151W Dialogue (4)
Literary studies comprise a broad field, engaging with nearly everything human beings know how to do with language. The works of art that we recognize as literary gain their distinctive power by doing things with language in especially engaging, complex ways. This class introduces students formally to the skills of reading and writing that enable us to appreciate—that is, to understand, to evaluate, to enjoy—the meaning and function of literary texts. These skills lay the foundation for students to successfully pursue a major or minor in English. To sharpen these skills, we will read a wide range of texts, examining the genres of poetry, drama, and prose fiction through works drawn from a variety of historical periods and English-using cultures from around the world. You will practice the conventions of writing about literature, using the text to advance your interpretation and support your critical insights. Works of literary criticism by scholars will provide models for this interpretation, and we will consider carefully how writers read and how scholars—as they read—frame questions about texts and consider plausible answers. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 151W Magic and Realism (4)
The stories we are told as children often contribute to how we see the world as adults. Fairy tales and myths influence the worlds created by authors throughout literary history. Beginning with Angela Carter’s Book of Fairy Tales and Ovid’s Metamorphoses, this class will explore common literature tropes and female figures, such as the damsel in distress and the evil stepmother. Then we’ll move forward in time, seeing how these tropes and figures were reinvented in texts that include George Bernard Shaw’s play Pygmalion and its film adaptation, the short stories of Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and a novel by Jane Austen. The aim is to discover what’s new and what’s lasting in global literature. Students will learn to read, analyze, and compose texts in order to become more engaged and critical of literature. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 151W Metamorphosis of the Self (4)
This course introduces students to reading and writing about literature at the college level.  Students will develop facility with analysis and the art of crafting persuasive, argumentative prose through an examination of literary works that present depictions of transformation, change, and metamorphosis.  As we read narratives of bodies altered (in size, shape, and substance) and worlds transformed, we will interrogate: the extent to which corporeal forms influence our sense of personal identity and our perception of others; the ways in which our sense of self can alter due to the state of the external world around us; and why stories of shapeshifting, physical transformation, and social upheaval have provoked such fascination and anxiety amongst audiences of all ages in diverse cultural and historical settings. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 151W World Building in Literature  (4)
This course explores the techniques and purposes of world building in literature. Any written text uses words to guide its reader in the creation of an imaginary place different from the present physical reality surrounding that reader. In literary texts, the constructions that result from the process of reading are sensuously vivid, emotionally compelling, and intellectually engaging, so that the reader may feel that she has entered another world. One useful way to improve 5 one’s understanding and enjoyment of literature, then, is to consider how literary texts guide their readers in a process of mental construction that results in something that can be experienced as an imagined world. The class’s readings will give particular attention to the genres of science fiction and fantasy, which foreground the project of world building. The reader of a work of science fiction, for example, expects to go to another planet, to the future, to an alternate history of the world, or some other imagined reality that differs from her own. Other types, other genres of literature approach world building differently. Poetry, drama, realist fiction, and even non-fiction each undertake world building in distinctive ways. This course will include works of literature drawn from each of these genres and from a variety of cultures, so that we can consider how cultural frameworks inform literary world building. We’ll read contemporary science fiction and fantasy by Ursula Le Guin and Jo Walton, Homer’s Odyssey in the new translation by Emily Wilson, a Shakespeare play, Aldo Leopold’s non-fiction classic A Sand County Almanac, and poetry by John Donne, Joy Harjo, and current Poet Laureate Tracy Smith. As a W course, the main assignments for this course will be essays. Four out-of-class essays and two in-class essays will be assigned, preparing students for the end-of-semester portfolio review. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ENLT 216 Literature of Social Justice (3)
What role do literary works play in advocating for a more just society?  Can literature provide a platform for social exploration?  An opportunity to engage the emotions of the public?  A space for disruption and critique?  What are the limitations of literary representations of social justice issues?  This course uses these guiding questions to examine works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction.  We’ll read texts that engage with issues including racism and antiracism, incarceration, environmental justice, health equity, and feminist activism.  As we read works published from the nineteenth-century to the present, we’ll also consider the role of reading in shaping our own value systems.  This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility. 

ENLT 255 Women of Genius: American Literature in the Suffragette Era (3)
At the turn of the 20th century, women in the United States were fighting for a voice—in politics, in society, in marriage; over their education, their bodies, and their economic well-being. How their struggle found its way into American fiction, drama, poetry, and journalism of the era is the focus of this course. A recurring figure in this literature is the woman who, against steep odds, gains an audience for herself, whether in print, or from the stage, the lectern, or the pulpit. Such avenues into public life (while restricted in comparison with the opportunities women have come to expect one hundred years later) paved the way for women’s fuller participation in the world—a condition essential for ushering in the modern era. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

HUST 103 Lives and Times (3)
What’s your place in the world? How will you tell your story? This lively discussion-based class will introduce you to the power of storytelling in our own lives and in the lives of those from the past. You will be introduced to a range of fascinating individuals, both real and imagined, as their stories appear in memoir, film, fiction, and art. We will ask: Why does place have such a powerful effect on who we are in the world? Why is a house often more than just a house? Why is the question “where are you from” often impossible to answer? How do ethnicity, race, and gender make me who I am? How do we learn from the stories of the past, and, more importantly, how do we tell stories of the future? Students will have an opportunity to write in analytic, digital, and creative formats. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility.

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History

HIST 190 History of England (3)
Welcome to our travelogue through British history. We will be travelling through town and country, from Westminster Abbey to the City of London, to the great landed estates and beautiful villages dotting the countryside. The major developments and issues in English history are reflected in its landscape, architecture, gardens, and great cities. Our main goal will be to give you a thorough background in the culture, women’s and social history, and historical geography of the British Isles. How did British history shape its landscapes? What happened in its great cities and beautiful countryside? How did the British live? Who were they in the past, and how did that make them who they are today? An important learning outcome of the course will be an intimate knowledge of the geography of these countries and the historical context of their evolution. This course should be an excellent preparation for a student going abroad who wants to understand the historical context of what she experiences in England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, and Cornwall. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility, LO3 Intercultural Competence and LO3 Global Learning.

HIST 201 United States History to 1865 (3)
What does it mean for the United States of America to be the “City on the Hill?” Historically, it has meant very different things, but many Americans still see their country as an example of freedom and opportunity, a beacon of hope, and a model for the rest of the world. The theme of our course is freedom, for as Eric Foner, the author of our textbook, writes, “No idea is more essential to Americans’ sense of themselves as individuals and as a nation than freedom.” But, “freedom is not a fixed timeless category with a single unchanging definition…the history of the United States is, in part, a story of debates, disagreements, and struggles over freedom…the meaning of freedom has been constructed not only in congressional debates and political treatises, but on plantations and picket lines, in parlors and even bedrooms” (Foner, p. xxxviii-xxxix). A major focus of our critical exploration of American history will be to analyze and reflect on changing understandings of the freedom that defines us as Americans. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices. Sections 73156 and 73059 also satisfy LO3 Social Responsibility. Section 73156 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

HIST 201W United States History to 1865 (4)
The content of this course is similar to that of HIST 201. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W. 

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Modern Languages

All bachelor degree programs require the successful completion of a full year of foreign language study: two sequential courses at the appropriate level, as determined by the student’s interests and her abilities as indicated by the online placement exam. A student who is enrolling at the introductory level (101) in a language that she has not studied in high school is not required to take the placement exam.

I speak English. Why should I learn another language?

“…[E]ffective communication and successful negotiations with a foreign partner — whether with a partner in peacekeeping, a strategic economic partner, a political adversary, or a non-English speaking contact in a critical law enforcement action — requires strong comprehension of the underlying cultural values and belief structures that are part of the life experience of the foreign partner.”
— Dr. Dan Davidson, President of the American Councils on International Education

“A different language is a different vision of life.”
— Federico Fellini, Italian film director

“To have another language is to possess a second soul” 
—Charlemagne, Holy Roman Emperor (747-814)

The knowledge of other languages and cultures is becoming more and more necessary in today’s globalized world, representing skills increasingly sought by employers both within and outside the United States, particularly for higher-level positions. Additionally, the ability to understand and communicate in another language and across cultures can lead to significant personal growth, both intellectually and spiritually, developing critical and interpretive thinking. (Some studies show a meaningful correlation between second language study and improved verbal and mathematical performance on tests such as the SAT or the MCAT.) Studying a second language can also open doors to self-knowledge and to participation in worlds you haven’t yet imagined.

Introductory Level – These courses are for students who have never studied the language or those who are continuing a language studied in high school and earned a score below 38 on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students who have earned high school credits in a language will not be allowed to enroll in the introductory level sequence (101) or the intermediate level sequence (111) of that language until they have taken the online placement exam.

Intermediate Level – These courses are for students who are continuing a language studied in high school and who demonstrate sufficient language competence to pursue intermediate study of the language with an emphasis on written and oral expression. Placement at the intermediate level will be determined by the Department of Modern Languages and Cultures based on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or higher must enroll at the intermediate level. Students who have earned high school credits in a language will not be allowed to enroll in the introductory level sequence (101) or the intermediate level sequence (111) of that language until they have taken the online placement exam.

Placement and Credit

The decision regarding which foreign language to study and whether to continue or begin a new language belongs to the student. First-year advisors will help a student weigh her interests and consider her ability, study abroad and career plans in order to advise her and help her reach a thoughtful decision.

The placement exam can be a helpful tool in the advising process. A student electing to continue the study of a foreign language  for which she has received high school credit must complete the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam before she will be allowed to enroll in either the introductory or the intermediate level.

The level in which the student enrolls may have an impact on her choice of study abroad programs or her ability to major in a particular language. The first-year advisor can provide all pertinent information, but the student and her academic advisor are encouraged to consult with the chair of Modern Languages and Cultures if there are any questions.

Eight credits in modern languages are awarded upon completion of the requirement. Students who complete the requirement at the intermediate level (111–112 or 115–116) or higher in their first year will receive an additional four semester hours of elective credit.

Recommendations:

  1. In deciding how to fulfill the modern languages requirement in the Sophia Program, the department encourages students to base their decision on their personal interests, taking into consideration their study abroad and career plans, as well as their linguistic ability. Students should discuss this decision with their first year advisor.
  2. A student starting a new language should complete the Sophia modern language requirement before the beginning of her junior year.
  3. A student wishing to major in Spanish or minor in French or Italian with no prior study of that language must enroll in the introductory level in her first year.
  4. Students may be exempt from the foreign language requirement by examination.

Arabic

MLAR 101 Introductory Arabic I (4)
An introduction to the Arabic language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to Arabic and Islamic cultures. College credit will not be granted for students who have earned high school credits in the language and who earned a score of 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Continues second semester as MLAR 102. Strongly recommended for students interested in study abroad in Morocco.

CHINESE

MLCH 101 Introductory Mandarin Chinese I (4)
An introduction to Mandarin. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to Chinese culture. College credit will not be granted for students who have earned high school credits in the language and who earned a score of 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Continues second semester as MLCH 102. Strongly recommended for students interested in study abroad in China.

FRENCH

MLFR 101 Introductory French I (4)
An introduction to the French language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to French and Francophone cultures. College credit will not be granted for students who have earned high school credits in the language and who earned a score of 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Continues second semester as MLFR 102. Strongly recommended for students interested in study abroad in Morocco and in Angers, France.

MLFR 111 Intermediate French I (4)
Designed to develop an intermediate level proficiency in French focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on French and Francophone cultures. Placement into this level is determined by the student’s score on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in the intermediate sequence. Continues second semester as MLFR 112. MLFR 111 is required for students interested in study abroad in Angers, France.

Italian

MLIT 101 Introductory Italian I (4)
An introduction to the Italian language. The focus is on developing language proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to Italian culture. College credit will not be granted for students who have earned high school credits in the language and who earned a score of 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Continues second semester as MLIT 102. Strongly recommended for students interested in study abroad in Rome. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and LO3 Global Learning.

MLIT 111 Intermediate Italian (4)
Designed to develop an intermediate level proficiency in Italian focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Italian culture. Placement into this level is determined by the student’s score on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in the intermediate sequence. The Modern Language Sophia requirement can be fulfilled with a second approved Italian language course.

Spanish

MLSP 101 Introductory Spanish I (4)
An introduction to the Spanish language. The focus is on developing increased proficiency in all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. The course also introduces students to Hispanic cultures. College credit will not be granted for students who have earned high school credits in the language and who earned a score of 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in one of the intermediate sequences (111–112 or 115–116). Continues second semester as MLSP 112. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and Córdoba, Argentina.

MLSP 111 Intermediate Spanish I (4)
Designed to develop an intermediate level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. Placement into this level is determined by the student’s score on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in the intermediate sequences (111–112 or 115–116). Continues second semester as MLSP 112. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and Córdoba, Argentina.

MLSP 115 Intermediate Spanish for Heritage Speakers I (4)
Designed to develop an intermediate level proficiency in Spanish focusing on all four skills: speaking, listening, reading, and writing, but with increased attention given to reading, writing, and grammar, as appropriate to heritage speakers. Emphasis is also placed on Hispanic cultures. Only students for whom Spanish plays a role in their lives (spoken at home; grandparents or other relatives who speak Spanish, whether or not they live in the student’s home; frequent engagement with Spanish-speaking communities, etc.) and who receive 38 or above on the Northwestern University Online Placement Exam may enroll in this sequence. Students earning a score of 38 or above must enroll in one of the intermediate sequences (111–112 or 115–116). Continues second semester as MLSP 116. MLSP 111 or MLSP 115 is required for study abroad in Seville, Spain and Córdoba, Argentina.
 

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Traditions and Worldviews

Philosophical Worldviews

PHIL 110 Introductory Philosophy (3)
Readings and discussions designed to introduce the student to the major areas and problems of philosophy through a study of the writings of classical and contemporary thinkers. Section 72832 also satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices, LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar LO3 Social Responsibility and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PHIL 110W Introductory Philosophy (3.5) 
A unit of the tandem The Art of Living, taken in conjunction with ART 112W Earth Art.  Both art and philosophy are concerned with exploring, expressing, critiquing, and creating ways of seeing our world and our place in it. Artists who create "earth art" do this in an especially deliberate way, taking as their medium our interactions with the natural world that provides the supporting context for all human endeavors to live a meaningful life. The philosopher, likewise, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium, in this case, life itself, exploring in a conceptual fashion what it might mean to live a life that is a rich and meaningful whole.

In this tandem we will read our way in historical order through some highlights of western philosophical attempts to discover, by deploying our capacity for abstract thought, what goes into fashioning a meaningful life. Along the way, we will discuss the nature of beauty and creativity, learning what we can from the very concrete activity of bringing aesthetically satisfying meaning forth by working with and through the opportunities our local natural environments present us. Assignments in one class will in many cases connect directly to those in the other, allowing us plenty of opportunity for exploring the connections between these two challenging and engaging disciplines. As the philosophy component of this tandem also fulfills a Women's Voices requirement in the Sophia Program, we will also be pausing on occasion to consider ways in which issues of gender factor into the work we are doing. This course satisfies an LO2 Women's Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

PHIL 235 Philosophy of Human Existence

This course offers an introduction to philosophy structured around encounters with a number of existentialist thinkers and their philosophical predecessors as they reflect on philosophical issues pertaining to human existence. These issues coalesce, ultimately, around the most serious philosophical question of them all: does human life have any meaning? Ultimately this course will provide students with an opportunity to think philosophically about how their views on human existence contribute to their larger views of the world and about how these views translate into concrete actions.

PHIL 247 Philosophy of Religion (3)
There are many questions that have vexed people of faith over the centuries. In this course, we will explore three of them: What, if anything, can we know about God? What is the relationship between faith and reason? And if God is all good, all knowing, and all powerful, then why does evil exist? We will examine these questions from philosophical perspectives (i.e., from perspectives that begin from reason rather than from faith). Popular films will be used to spark discussion and introduce classical readings.

 

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Religious Traditions

RLST 101 Introducing Religious Studies: Encounters with the Divine in Ancient Mediterranean Dialogue (3)
This course will broaden students’ understanding of the nature and complexities of religion and  allow them to gain an understanding of how religion interacts with other aspects of culture by  examining the worldviews, beliefs, practices, symbols, and social formations of Greco-Roman  religions, Second Temple Judaism, and Pauline Christianity. The course is divided into three  sections devoted to each of these three religious traditions. As this occurs, students will explore  each religion’s capacity to provide meaning to life, while considering their potential to challenge  and transform individuals and societies. Topics such as God/gods, myth, cosmology, evil,  sickness, suffering, death, afterlife, ethics, ritual, love, mysticism/prayer, and community will be  addressed. The study of these religious ideas and expressions will be done by reading ancient  writings and contemporary secondary texts. Early Christianity will be encountered through the  mission and writings of Paul the Apostle. While studying Greco-Roman religions, Second  Temple Judaism, and Pauline Christianity and the cultural norms within which these three  religions thrived, similar and/or divergent religious ideas from contemporary American popular  culture are also highlighted to show similarities and differences from contemporary cultural  practices and beliefs. Students will consider how these ancient religions’ search for meaning,  particularly Christianity’s, is still relevant to humanity’s search for meaning today. The ancient  world in which these three religions thrived, much like ours today, was a world full of dramatic  changes, rapid development, increased urbanization, potential prosperity, and potential danger.  Thus, students will gain an understanding of how these three ancient religions helped people to  cope with all of the challenges of ancient life and to feel at home in the cosmos.

RLST 101 Introducing Religious Studies: World Religions in Dialogue (3)
How can learning about religion help us understand others, our world, and ourselves? This writing-intensive course will explore that question as we gain a sound basic understanding of Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Islam, and the nature of religion. We’ll take three main approaches. First, we’ll practice scholarly tools that will help us understand religions, others, and ourselves better. Second, we’ll learn some of the major concepts that make these religions distinctive, and perhaps make them similar as well. Finally, we’ll examine how religions and interreligious dialogue are portrayed in different kinds of media, including contemporary news stories. Students will also have the opportunity to develop skills needed for college-level and professional writing, and each student will create a portfolio of her work to submit for LO2: Basic Writing Proficiency.  This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and LO3 Intercultural Competence .

RLST 101W Introducing Religious Studies: World Religions in Dialogue (4)
The content of this course is similar to that of RLST 101 Introducing Religious Studies: World Religions in Dialogue. This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence and provides students the opportunity to earn the W. 

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Historical Perspectives

ART 241 Art History Survey I (3)
A survey of the historical development of Western and non-­Western art and architecture beginning with the Neolithic period and leading up to the thirteenth century. We will study works of art in their cultural contexts in order to gain an understanding of the purpose, meaning, and significance of works of art to those who made and used them. Emphasis will be placed on the exchange of knowledge, ideas, forms, and iconography across cultures over time, and the subsequent change in the meaning and significance of these when put to new uses in new contexts. We will discuss current issues and debates in art history, such as responsible collection practices and repatriation of art objects. We will relate the aesthetic experiences and values of cultures from our period of study to contemporary culture. Over the course of the semester, students will develop their own analysis of the purpose, meaning, and significance of a single art object that they have viewed in a museum, and which dates from the chronological period the course covers. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Global Learning.

ENVS 161 Introduction to Environmental Studies (3)
An interdisciplinary course on the systemic interaction of human beings with their environments. It identifies interests informing environmental decisions and introduces practices of environmental advocacy. This course also satisfies LO3 Global Learning, LO3 Social Responsibility.

GWS 207 Introduction to Gender and Women’s Studies (3)
This interdisciplinary course introduces students to the field of gender and women’s studies. The course will enable students to understand how gender impacts their everyday lives, social institutions, and cultural practices both locally and globally. Additionally, students will examine the significance and meaning of one’s gender identity in different historical periods, the history of feminist movements, and transnational perspectives on feminism. Students will also discuss how gender intersects with other identity categories such as socioeconomic class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, age, geography, and generational location. Lastly, students will examine and critique cultural representations and claims about women and gender identities. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Global Learning and LO3 Social Responsibility.

HUST 197W Myth, Legend, and History (4)
Truth or fiction? This course explores different ways of seeing (in)famous women from Eve to Cleopatra, Mary to Joan of Arc. Through class discussions, interdisciplinary readings (fiction and nonfiction, literature and history), art, lectures, and film, we will study what myths and legends—both ancient and modern—tell us about the past and about ourselves. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Global Learning, LO3 Social Responsibility and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.  Section 73391 is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

HUST 205 History of Famous Women  (3)
What is the real story behind iconic women like Joan of Arc, Elizabeth I, Abigail Adams, Rosa Parks, and Jackie Kennedy? This course takes an in-depth look at these women and others who have been ranked among the most inspirational women of all time. We will examine the stories of these women as well as add to the list of “worthies” by creating their own pantheon of women for the 21st century. The course emphasizes classroom discussion supplemented by occasional lectures, films, and slides. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility.

ICS 201 Introduction to Intercultural Studies (3)
This course provides an introduction to understanding the cultural construction of individual and collective identities such as race, class, gender, sexuality, and religion. We will begin by establishing a theoretical understanding of what culture is and how it operates, both globally and locally. And then we will examine how colonization and imperialism impact cultural conflict in the US and around the world. Key issues covered include how race has been constructed historically and culturally; how power and privilege perpetuate interpersonal, systemic, and institutional racism; and how to challenge racism and other forms of oppression. By the end of the semester, students will have a foundation for understanding and addressing inequality in our interconnected world. This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence.

ICS 201W Introduction to Intercultural Studies (4)
The content of this course is similar to that of ICS 201. This course also satisfies LO3 Intercultural Competence and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

MUS 243 Latin American and Latino Popular Music (3)
The term Popular Music in Latin-America describes several dozen different musical styles originated or related to Latin America, the Caribbean and the Latino Population in the US. This course is an introduction to Latin American popular music through a survey that will provide a broad and comprehensive panorama on these styles. We will talk about the main composers and performers, geographical location, history as well as cultural and sociopolitical backgrounds of each style. In addition to that we will address lyrics and musical characteristics such as instrumentation and rhythmic patterns of selected musical examples to shape our understanding of the music. Students from all disciplines may take the course. No prior knowledge of music, Spanish or Portuguese is required.  This course also satisfies LO3 Global Learning and LO3 Intercultural Competence.

MUS 244W History of Rock 'n' Roll: The Beatles! (3.5)
A unit of the tandem The Beatles!, taken in conjunction with COMM 103W. This course will look at the History of Rock ‘n’ Roll with a special attention to the Beatles – their influences and their effect. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility, LO3 Intercultural Competence and provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

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Science for the Citizen

Natural Sciences

BIO 141 Human Anatomy and Physiology I  (4)
First of a two-part sequence for the intended nursing major that details human anatomy and physiology from an organ system approach. This course will cover the chemical basis of cells, cell microscopy, and tissue types as well as the integumentary system, skeletal system, muscular system, and nervous system (including special senses). Course content will also include discussions about health/disease issues of concern as they pertain to the current course material. Laboratory content will include use of the scientific method as well as acquisition and application of knowledge pertaining to physiological processes as discussed in lecture. Offered fall semester for first-year intended nursing majors; three hours of lecture and three hours of lab per week. Note: $100 lab fee applies. For nursing intended majors.

BIO 155 Foundations of Molecular Biology (2)
A survey of foundational concepts in biology, with a focus on molecular biology. Part of the introductory Foundations of Biology courses for biology majors, but available to non-majors as well. This course will cover an introduction to biochemistry, the organic molecules important for life, and classical Mendelian and modern genetics. A half-semester course that must be taken with a lab. NOTE: $50 lab fee applies. For biology and chemistry intended majors. Two Foundation courses must be completed to fulfill Sophia learning outcomes.

BIO 156 Foundations of Ecology and Evolution (2)
A survey of foundational concepts in biology, with a focus on ecology and evolution. Part of the introductory Biology Foundations courses for biology majors, but available to non-majors as well. This course will cover how organisms interact with one another and their environment, the dynamic functioning of ecosystems, the origin and diversification of life on Earth, and the evolutionary forces that shape patterns of biodiversity within populations and across lineages. A half-semester course that must be taken with a lab. NOTE: $50 lab fee applies. For biology and chemistry intended majors. Two Foundation courses must be completed to fulfill Sophia learning outcomes.

CHEM 121 Principles of Chemistry I (4)
An introduction to chemical stoichiometry, atomic and molecular structure, and bonding. Laboratory will explore principles presented in lecture. Three-hour lecture and one three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite: high school chemistry or permission of the instructor; students must be calculus-ready. NOTE: $100 lab fee applies. For biology, chemistry, physics and engineering intended majors. This course also satisfies the LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar. Lab section 72494 is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PHYS 107 Artificial Intelligence in Science and Everyday Life  (3)
This course is an introduction to concepts and applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) in Science and everyday life. It aims to give an understanding of the use and interpretation of available data and more particularly the STEM scientific data to recover accurate information using prediction techniques. This course will be based on the use of AI interactively with the students to solve real problems and predict solutions.

PHYS 121 General Physics I: Mechanics and Waves (4)
An introduction to mechanics, waves, and thermodynamics. This is the first semester of a two-part calculus-based physics sequence. Three hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory. Designed for students in science, math, and engineering .

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Social Science I 

ANTH 253 Survey I: Culture and Language (3)
A survey of sociocultural anthropology and anthropological linguistics. The course takes a comparative approach to the study of culture. Topics include: family, kinship, and marriage; cultural ecology and economics; political organization; gender roles and socialization; religion and ritual; and culture change. Basic concepts, methods of research, and analytic perspectives are introduced. This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility, LO3 Global Learning, and LO3 Intercultural Competence.

ENVS 217 Environmental Policy  (3)
This course introduces the processes by which policy is made at local, state, national, and international levels of government with attention to the special challenges of creating sound environmental policy. It examines the strengths and weaknesses of policies currently in place and prepares students to intervene constructively in the formation of environmental policy. This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility.

ENVS 290 Sustainable Food Systems (3)
Over the past 150 years, food systems have been transformed by developments in society, technology, science, and policy. At the same time that many of these changes have improved the human condition, they have also created new challenges. For instance, new technologies in farming equipment and synthetic fertilizers vastly increased the per-acre output of farms, but also contributed to the collapse of rural communities and the eutryphication of water ways. This class examines how the relationship between society and food has affected and been affected by the intertwining forces of industrialization, urbanization, and globalization. We will interrogate positions that the industrial food system is 'inevitable' or 'indispensible' to feeding a global population of 9 billion. This class will explore how technology and policy has helped bring about societies in which high levels of obesity, food insecurity, and food waste coexist. Students will examine critical case studies (e.g., GMOs, biofuels) to learn how these challenges are understood as policy problems and how science and technology are mobilized to address these problems. This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility.

POSC 151W Political Issues (4)
An analysis of various political ideas, systems, issues, and/or phenomena designed to introduce students to political thinking. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

POSC 201

  

American Politics

  

(3)

  

This course serves as an introductory survey of the major principles, institutions, processes, functions, and behavioral patterns of the American political system. It helps students to develop a broad, diverse, and articulate base of knowledge and understanding of American politics and government.

PSYC 156 Introduction to Psychology: Culture and Systems (3)
An introductory survey of theories, topics, and applications in psychology. Courses cover a wide range of classic and contemporary topics in psychology, which may include: brain and behavior, child development, thinking and intelligence, social influences on behavior and psychological disorders. The 156 course is organized around systems of thought and social science concepts that identify biological, psychodynamic, cognitive, behavioral, and sociocultural approaches to psychological topics. Students will recognize the impact of human diversity, and learn that psychological explanations vary across populations and contexts. A student cannot earn credit for both PSYC 156 and PSYC 157.

SOC 255 Race, Ethnicity, and Identity in the United States (3)
Race and ethnic identity have played and continue to play an important role in shaping the nation’s political policies, social relationships, and cultural beliefs. In this course students will consider how race and ethnicity are socially constructed, what is meant by racism and racial/ethnic identity, how laws like Affirmative Action or immigration policies impact specific racial and ethnic groups, and how race/ethnicity shapes one’s experiences in various social institutions such as school, work, family, and the legal system. Over the semester students will develop a sociological understanding of the structural and cultural barriers experienced by various racial and ethnic groups in the United States, and students will discuss social policies focused on achieving racial equity. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, LO3 Social Responsibility and LO3 Intercultural Competence. This course is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

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Social Science II 

ECON 251 Principles of Macroeconomics (3)
An analysis of US economic issues such as unemployment, inflation and the business cycle, as well as government policies used to correct these problems. Since we live in a global economy, international trade and economic development are also explored. By taking this course, the student should be able to understand the fundamentals of macroeconomic issues and how they impact households and businesses. This is a required course for accounting, business administration, economics and global studies majors.

ECON 252 Principles of Microeconomics (3)
Microeconomics examines the various segments contained in the circular flow — consumer behavior, production, how firms behave in various product markets, labor markets and their resulting income issues and why the market fails, at times, to provide efficient results. How market forces allocate limited output to best satisfy society’s changing unlimited wants is central. A strong emphasis is placed on real-world business applications to show the importance of economic analysis and business decision making. This is a required course for business and economics majors. Section 72683 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

PSYC 157 Introduction to Psychology: Science for the Citizen (3)
An introductory survey of theories, topics and applications in psychology. Courses cover a wide range of classic and contemporary topics in psychology, which may include: brain and behavior, child development, thinking and intelligence, social influences on behavior, and psychological disorders. The 157 course emphasizes social science methodology and, therefore, students will conduct basic studies to address psychological questions using appropriate research methods. A student cannot earn credit for both PSYC 156 and PSYC 157. Section 73215 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

SOC 203 Social Problems (3)
This course focuses on some of the phenomena that have been identified as social problems in the United States. Among the issues discussed are poverty, gender and racial stratification,  hyperconsumerism, changing family structures, inequality in the educational system, health care issues, the work environment, drug abuse, and crime. Particular attention will be given to the role of the social structure in the creation and perpetuation of social problems, and how social problems are interrelated. Section 72828 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar, LO3 Global Learning, and LO3 Social Responsibility.

SOC 273 Introduction to Crime and Society (3)
As an introduction to the topic of criminology, this course examines crime as a social problem within American society. Particular attention is given to the nature and function of law in society, theoretical perspectives on crime, victimology, sources of crime data, the social meaning of criminological data, and the various societal responses to crime. These topics are addressed through specialized readings, discussion, and analysis. This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility.

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Arts for Living

Creative and Performing Arts

ART 101 Drawing I (3)
This is a broad foundation course that introduces a variety of drawing techniques, approaches and subject matter. A focus on observational drawing improves the student's ability to "see" (visual perception) and develops technical drawing skills. Projects are designed to enhance the understanding and use of formal elements, principles and composition while exploring drawing's creative and expressive potential. subject matter includes still life, landscape, interiors, and the figure. Studio projects are augmented by critiques, visual presentations and discussion. Sketchbook/journal required. Section 72451 is tied to a first-year faculty advisor.

ART 103 Design Lab (3)
The main goal of Design Lab I is to solve design (world?) problems through creative design solutions. In learning how to visually communicate in imaginative ways, you’re seeking to radically alter how people look at and perceive the world around them. You will become an effective and imaginative cultural producer. For this course, students will use some of the digital creative software found in the Adobe Creative Suite, as well as other digital software. Other techniques include collage, drawing, photography, printmaking, and videography.

As a Critical Thinking Seminar-designated course (or CTS), students will critically analyze and discuss the power of design solutions (images, objects, interactivity) in light of design components (form, composition, balance, shape, space, color, for example). This course foregrounds the process of design in a variety of ways, namely through creative projects. You’ll create your design solutions through a combination of form and content, and in a variety of contexts. In other words, you will integrate visual information with meaning or message, in a presentation method. Your creative work will always be discussed in light of, and at times be presented to, the general public or an audience. What can your audience learn about the world through your design work? How do they learn it? What can (or will) they do as a result of what they’re learning?This course also satisfies the LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

ART 112W Earth Art (3.5)
A unit of the tandem The Art of Living, taken in conjunction with 

A unit of the tandem The Art of Living, taken in conjunction with PHIL 110W Introduction to Philosophy . Both art and philosophy are concerned with exploring, expressing, critiquing, and creating ways of seeing our world and our place in it. Artists who create "earth art" do this in an especially deliberate way, taking as their medium our interactions with the natural world that provides the supporting context for all human endeavors to live a meaningful life. The philosopher, likewise, reaches for a deeper understanding of her medium, in this case, life itself, exploring in a conceptual fashion what it might mean to live a life that is a rich and meaningful whole.

In this tandem we will read our way in historical order through some highlights of western philosophical attempts to discover, by deploying our capacity for abstract thought, what goes into fashioning a meaningful life. Along the way, we will discuss the nature of beauty and creativity, learning what we can from the very concrete activity of bringing aesthetically satisfying meaning forth by working with and through the opportunities our local natural environments present us. Assignments in one class will in many cases connect directly to those in the other, allowing us plenty of opportunity for exploring the connections between these two challenging and engaging disciplines. As the philosophy component of this tandem also fulfills a Women's Voices requirement in the Sophia Program, we will also be pausing on occasion to consider ways in which issues of gender factor into the work we are doing. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

ART 216 Introduction to Furniture Design (3)
Introduction to Furniture Design focuses on the design and construction of furniture and functional objects within the context of contemporary culture. It integrates creative problem solving with technical and material processes in order to build objects that are ergonomic and interactive. Students will learn a process of design that evolves from sketch, to model -or- prototype, and finally to a finished, usable object. Design for social good and sustainability will also be a departure point for creative projects. Creative projects and technical demonstrations will be augmented by lectures on the history of furniture design and contemporary approaches to functional object-making.

ART 221 Photography I (3)
Introductory black and white photography. Students study the basic elements necessary for control in the exposure, development and printing of photographic materials. Initial exploration of the medium stresses consideration of its visual and aesthetic dimensions through a creative problem-solving approach. (Variable shutter/aperture camera required). This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

ART 223 Introduction to Digital Photography (3)
Students study basic elements for the recording and printing of digital images. Initial exploration of the medium places emphasis on the visual, aesthetic and expressive dimensions of the medium through a creative problem-­solving approach. (Digital or film camera required, digital media required)

COMM 103 Introduction to Communication (3)
Students develop an increased competency in communicating with precision and style, and also have the opportunity to think critically and creatively about the process of communication. Major topics in communication theory and practice are surveyed in addition to a focus on public speaking. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar. Section 72704 is tied to a first-year faculty advisor.

COMM 103W Introduction to Communication: The Beatles! (3.5)
A unit of the tandem The Beatles!, taken in conjunction with MUS 244W.  This course uses Peter Jackson's 2021 film Get Back, that documents the creation of the last Beatles collaboration. We'll study the group’s communication behavior as we  cover various communication settings: intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, intercultural, and public communication. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W. 

COMM 103W Introduction to Communication (4)
Essentially, students in COMM 103W Introduction to Communications explore one central question: What is human communication? While it is true that humans use verbal “message-and-response” interchanges, we will discover that communication is a sophisticated, ongoing process. This will lead us to other questions: When and where does human communication occur? How has it shaped centuries of human development? What makes us choose one form of communication — email, text messages, etc. — over another? What are the effects of each medium of communication on the quality of our messages?This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and provides students the opportunity to earn the W. Section 73184 is tied to a first-year faculty advisor.

Multiple dance courses may be used to satisfy the Creative and Performing Arts requirement as long as they add up to at least three credit hours. Students receive two credits for technique courses taken for the first time and one credit for subsequent enrollment in the same level technique course.

DANC 145 Ballet Technique: Beginning (2)
An introduction to basic ballet technique and terminology. Designed for students with no previous movement training. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 148 Jazz Technique: Beginning (2)
A practical course in contemporary jazz technique hip hop and lyrical styles. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 245 Ballet Technique: Intermediate (2)
A technique course with an emphasis on correct alignment and proper execution of barre and center exercises. May be repeated for one credit.

DANC 248 Jazz Technique: Intermediate (2)
Jazz technique at an intermediate level with emphasis on performance and styles; may be repeated for one credit.

DANC 345 Ballet Technique: Advanced (2)
A continuation of ballet technique with an emphasis on accuracy, style, intricate combinations, strength, endurance, and a more extensive vocabulary; may be repeated for one credit.

DANC 348 Jazz Technique: Advanced (2)
A continuation of jazz technique providing a stimulating and rigorous application of both the traditional jazz dance vocabulary and contemporary styles; may be repeated for one credit.

ENVS 232 The Shape of the City (3)
The course covers topics in the design and planning of the American metropolis – towns, cities, and suburbs. The fundamentals of urban design are explored at varied scales and within varied contexts of the built environment – from the individual building to the city block to the neighborhood to the community and larger region – in order to establish the basic principles of livable community design and planning. This course surveys the history of urban form and the socioeconomic, cultural, historical, and environmental forces that have shaped the city. Topics include public architecture and art, landscape architecture, open space and parks, multi-modal transportation, community health and safety, land use policy and regulations, real estate, and the impact of climate change. The process of urban design is explored including the role of multiple stakeholders – government, private sector, non-profit organizations, schools, neighborhoods, and the public. The neighborhood as human ecosystem is featured as a fundamental building block of cities and regions. Through the completion of a series of projects, students develop an understanding of urban design principles through engagement with a real-life neighborhood in the South Bend area. Sustainable design including connectivity, density, green infrastructure, and health receives special emphasis. This course also satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility.

ENWR 202 Introduction to Creative Writing (3)
In Introduction to Creative Writing, you will learn to write poetry, literary short fiction, and creative nonfiction, as well as to critically read works in all three genres.  This will be accomplished through reading assignments, in-class writing assignments, full-class workshops, and class discussions of assigned readings and craft techniques.  Class time will be split between discussion, in-class writing exercises, and full-class workshops.

ENWR 202W Introduction to Creative Writing (4) 
This special section of Introduction to Creative Writing will teach you the basics of writing poetry, fiction and creative nonfiction, while also fulfilling the "W" requirement. Every student will write original, creative work in all three genres, and we'll use the fourth hour to write a series of thesis-driven papers related to creative writing that will help fulfill the requirements of the "W" portfolio. Class time will be split between reading published works of poetry, fiction and nonfiction, writing exercises designed to teach you the basics of creative writing, and full-class workshops. This class will help you strengthen your writing skills at large, learn about the arts, and practice creatively-focused, imaginative problem solving. This course provides students the opportunity to earn the W.

MUS 111–131 Applied Music: Private Lessons — Instrumental or Voice (1–2 credits)
Multiple courses may be used to satisfy the Creative and Performing Arts requirement as long as they add up to at least three credit hours. Lessons are offered for voice, piano, and all brass, string, woodwind and percussion instruments. Fees are $400 per semester for a half-hour lesson a week (one semester hour of credit), and $600 per semester for a 50-minute lesson a week (two semester hours of credit).

MUS 150 Voices in Time: A Critical Thinking Seminar (3)
As musicians ourselves and passionate listeners, many of us acknowledge a love for music and an appreciation of its power to move us emotionally. But what does it mean to really know a piece of music? This course will examine ways of knowing and understanding the art of music, in this case, music created or interpreted by women. We will consider the genesis and creation of a work, the historical/political climate in which it was created, the personal story of the composer or personal artist at the center of the work, the reception of the work and its influence on society; all facets of a critical understanding at the center of an informed reading or performance. In this way, the course will examine the contributions women have made to the field of human knowledge and art by composing and performing music. This course will also serve as a Critical Thinking Seminar. As such, we will focus on sharpening skills in interpretation, analysis, evaluation, inference and explanation. An introduction to the problem of searching out and utilizing appropriate resource materials will be a further component of the course. Though there will be a component of classroom performance, no previous experience or training is necessary. This course also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar and an LO2 Women's Voices.

MUS 181 Theory I: Fundamentals of Music (3)
For students with little or no previous training in music. A study of the organizational principles inherent in pitch and rhythm systems, with emphasis on the notation of these in written symbols. Such concepts as tonality, transposition, modulation, harmonic motion, and simple forms are introduced. Aural skills, keyboard applications, and the development of fluency in notation are stressed. One half-hour of computer drill per week is required. First semester of the theory sequence for majors and minors.

MUSIC ENSEMBLE

Students may enroll for ensemble courses that offer one hour of credit per semester. Auditions are required before acceptance into any of the choral ensembles. After you arrive on campus, sign up for an audition appointment in Moreau Hall, Room 309. If you are selected for one of the groups, you may add the course to your schedule through PRISM or at Student Academic Services (166 Le Mans Hall).

MUS 201 Collegiate Choir (1)
A treble choir that performs primarily on campus. Goals include developing excellent individual and group tone quality, working toward clear and proper diction, and strengthening aural and music reading abilities. Performs quality treble repertoire, both sacred and secular, in 2–4 parts. Membership by audition only. Auditions will take place during August orientation through the first week of classes.

MUS 203 Belles Voix (1)
This is the College’s select treble ensemble which performs music of all periods with an emphasis on new music. The choir regularly commissions and records new works, takes national concert tours every other year, and makes regular Carnegie Hall appearances. The ensemble performs biennially with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra and hosts the annual High School Treble Choir Festival. Membership is by audition only which will take place during August orientation through the first week of classes. 

MUS 207

  

Concert Band

  

(1)

  

Concert band is a non-auditioned instrumental ensemble open to all members of the college community. The course includes the study and performance of significant concert band literature. May be repeated for credit.

THTR 205 Introduction to Acting (3)
Exploration of the elements of a realistic acting technique using games, improvisations and exercises, culminating in two-character scenes later in the semester. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

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Professional Arts

HUST 220 Humanities at Work: Using Your Humanities Training in the 21st Century (3)
This class will help you connect the dots between your love of books and your curiosity about life after college, between analyzing a text and analyzing a data set. It will equip you with answers to big questions like what do we mean when we say the "humanities," and what can you do with a degree in English or History? The class features discussion as well as digital and project-based assignments. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices.

SLP 220 Introduction to Communicative Disorders (3)
A study of the causes, characteristics, and treatments of speech, language, and hearing disorders. Course content also includes speech and language development and suggestions for living and working with those who have communicative disorders. For speech language pathology intended majors. This course also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices, LO3 Social Responsibility, and LO3 Academic Experiential Learning.  This course is linked with a first-year faculty advisor.

SW 202 Introduction to Social Work (3)
This course is an introduction to the profession of social work through an exploration of social work issues related to increasing the well being of, and making a difference with, individuals, families, groups, communities, organizations, and society. Course includes an examination of social work global and national practices, case studies, policies, values and ethics, research, and literature of social work. Overview of the different fields in which social workers engage in leadership positions, including global social work, medical and health care social work, public policy analysis and planning, political social work, program administration, clinical/mental health social work (psychotherapy and counseling), criminal justice (forensic) social work, school social work, gerontological social work, and child welfare/family services social work, including social work practice with trauma-informed care and the application of neuroscience. This course is excellent preparation for entry into any field, taught by faculty who have experience in the field, and also satisfies an LO2 Women’s Voices and LO3 Social Responsibility. Section 72664 also satisfies LO2 Critical Thinking Seminar.

SW 235 Human Behavior and the Social Environment I (3)
This course introduces students to a unique way of thinking about human behavior and the social environment by teaching students how to examine the person in the environment. The generalist social work theoretical framework will be used to explain the interactions of individuals, families, and groups within their environments. Biopsycho-social-spiritual-cultural factors that affect human development and behavior are addressed as are neuroscience factors and trauma-informed care. Gender, race, cultural heritage, oppression, social justice, social class, and other diversity issues affecting human behavior and development are studied. Resources and obstacles in dealing with crises in the developmental life cycle from the prenatal period, infancy, and childhood, through adolescence, young adulthood, and older adulthood are examined. Topics such as sexuality, drugs, alcohol, gangs (criminal justice), anorexia and bulimia, domestic violence, child abuse and neglect, and global social work issues are addressed. This course is excellent preparation for entry into any field, taught by faculty who have experience in the field, and also satisfies an LO3 Social Responsibility. 

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Mathematical Arts

If you wish to select a mathematics course for the first semester, the following courses are offered. Suggestions for the appropriate course according to high school background, aptitude, interests, and performance on the math placement test are given with each description. The placement test is required for all incoming students and MUST be completed before registering for the fall semester.

The Mathematics department will determine a recommended math course placement based on your scores and previous math experience.   Any student who wishes to take a more advanced course than is recommended or who has concerns about placement should contact the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science via the following email: mathplacement@saintmarys. edu. In this email, include your scores, your academic background (performance in math classes in high school), and your intended major (if you have one).

Math Placement Scores Course Math Placement Score Math SAT Math ACT Min. # of Years of Math in High School AP Calculus AB Exam 100 20 or less 460 or less 18 or less 3 N/A 102 21-26 470-520 19-23 3 N/A 103 25-35 490-560 21-25 3 N/A 104 26-34 530-570 23-26 3 N/A 113 23-40 550-610 25-28 4 N/A 131 36-44 570 or better 26 or better 4 3 or less 132 40 or better 600 or better 28 or better 4 3 or better 133 44 or better 630 or better 29 or better 4 4 or better

Please note that students in need of stronger basic mathematics problem-solving skills (as shown by previous academic background and performance on the placement test) must take MATH 100 Problem-Solving Strategies in Mathematics . Students wishing to enroll in a calculus course (MATH 113 Survey of Calculus, MATH 131 Calculus I) that are in need of more preparation (as shown by previous academic background and performance on the math placement test) must successfully complete MATH 103 Precalculus  before enrolling.

MATH 100 Problem-Solving Strategies in Mathematics (3)
This course is an intensive study of the problem-solving process. Algebraic, patterning, modeling, and geometric strategies are explored. This course does not fulfill a Sophia Program requirement in mathematical arts but is required for students whose basic mathematics problem-solving skills need to be stronger for college level work. This is required for students with three or four years of high school math who meet any one of the following: Math SAT score of 460 or less, Math ACT score of 18 or less, or math placement test score of 20 or less. This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. This course is offered only in the fall semester.

MATH 102 Liberal Arts Mathematics (3)
This course focuses on mathematical modeling through the use of graph theory. Topics include graphs, directed graphs, trees, matchings, and network flows.

MATH 103 Precalculus (3)
This course is a study of polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions from the symbolic, numeric, and graphical perspectives that provides a solid preparation for a college-level calculus course. Recommended for students who need a calculus course for their program of study but who are not yet ready for the calculus course. This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. This course is offered during the summer term from June 20th through July 29th and also in fall semester.  It is not offered spring semester.

MATH 104 Finite Mathematics (3)
Set theory, counting techniques, probability, random variables, expected value, variance, standard deviation, and linear programming are all covered in this course.

MATH 113 Survey of Calculus (4)
One semester survey of differential and integral calculus designed primarily for liberal arts students and those in the professional programs. Limits are treated intuitively. Emphasis on applications in biology, economics, and other disciplines.

MATH 131 Calculus I (4)
This course covers algebraic and transcendental functions, limits, continuity, derivatives, maxima and minima, concavity, related rates, Mean Value Theorem, anti-differentiation, Riemann sums, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course is based on graphical, numerical, and symbolic points of view. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Monday. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that students keep this time free in their schedules so that they may attend the problem session.

MATH 132 Calculus II (4)
This is the continuation of Calculus I. It includes the techniques of integration, applications of the integral, and sequences and series. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Monday. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that students keep this time free in their schedules so that they may attend the problem session. Students should register for this course as a first math course only if they have credit for Calculus I or placed into the course. This course does not fulfill the Sophia Program requirement in Mathematical Arts. However, students who have the equivalent of two semesters of AP calculus in high school with strong supporting test scores may be placed into MATH 132 in consultation with the Math Placement Advisor. Students who are placed into MATH 132 and earn a grade of C or higher are eligible to receive credit for MATH 131 Calculus I.

MATH 133 Theory and Application of Calculus (4)
This course is designed for students who have completed a full year of calculus in high school at the AP or equivalent level and have mastered the mechanics of differentiation and integration. Students who have taken the Math AP AB Exam should have a score of at least a 41. Students who have not taken the AP test should have two semesters of calculus at or above the AP level in high school and at least a 630 on the Math SAT or a 29 on the Math ACT. The basic concepts of calculus, including limits, derivatives, integrals, sequences, and series, will be explored in depth. The content of a full-year college- level calculus sequence is included in this one-semester course. The emphasis of the course is on understanding the theory of calculus and constructing mathematical models. Graphing calculators are used throughout the course. It is typically followed by MATH 231 Calculus III. Note: There is a problem session offered for this course every Wednesday at the same time as the class is taught on Monday. The problem session is optional, but it is highly recommended that students keep this time free in their schedules so that they may attend the problem session. This course is offered only in the fall semester.

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Elective Course Offerings Fall 2022

Dance

In addition to the dance courses listed under Creative and Performing Arts, the following course is available for elective credit. For both Sophia and elective dance courses, students receive two credit hours for technique courses taken for the first time and one credit hour for subsequent enrollment in the same level technique course. All two-credit technique courses include an academic component: required and recommended literary sources, as well as written midterm and final examinations that test knowledge of terminology and movement concepts.

DANC 243

  

Dance Ensemble Workshop (DEW)

  

(1-3)

  

The ensemble functions as the student dance company in residence. The dancers meet on a regular basis for technique classes, master classes and rehearsals with faculty and guest choreographers. D.E.W. presents an annual concert. Variable credit offered for performance and production. Performance students must be concurrently enrolled in a technique class. May be repeated for a maximum of 9 credits. By audition/permission only.

Environmental Studies

ENVS 203 Sustainability at Saint Mary’s College and in the Holy Cross Charism (2)
This course will address sustainability in the context of the local academic community and its institutions. In light of the recent papal encyclical, Laudato si, On Care for Our Common Home, this course will provide students an opportunity to explore in an interdisciplinary way the challenges of sustainability and develop collaborative strategies for making our common campus homes more sustainable. This course will be offered concurrently at ND, SMC, and HCC, and will be co-taught by faculty from all three campuses. It will meet in rotation on each of the three campuses once per week for two hours. Students will be invited to examine the course materials in conversation with the mission of the Congregation of Holy Cross through immersion at each of the campuses and encounters with the sisters, brothers, and priests of Holy Cross and with sustainability professionals. This course satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility but does not fulfill an LO1 requirement. 

Music

MUS 101

  

Class Piano – Beginners

  

(1)

  

Beginning piano for those with no previous keyboard experience, using the electronic piano lab. Designed to develop music skills through correlation of music fundamentals with beginning piano literature, including folk songs, holiday songs, easy classics, and blues.

MUS 111–131 Applied Music: Private Lessons — Instrumental or Voice (1–2 credits)Lessons are offered for voice, piano, and all brass, string, woodwind and percussion instruments. Fees are $400 per semester for a half-hour lesson a week (one semester hour of credit), and $600 per semester for a 50-minute lesson a week (two semester hours of credit).

MUS 201 Collegiate Choir (1)
A treble choir that performs primarily on campus. Goals include developing excellent individual and group tone quality, working toward clear and proper diction, and strengthening aural and music reading abilities. Performs quality treble repertoire, both sacred and secular, in 2–4 parts. Membership by audition only. Auditions will take place during August orientation through the first week of classes.

MUS 203 Belles Voix (1)
This is the College’s select treble ensemble which performs music of all periods with an emphasis on new music. The choir regularly commissions and records new works, takes national concert tours every other year, and makes regular Carnegie Hall appearances. The ensemble performs biennially with the South Bend Symphony Orchestra and hosts the annual High School Treble Choir Festival. Membership is by audition only which will take place during August orientation through the first week of classes. 

MUS 206

  

String Ensemble

  

(1)

  

String Ensemble is a non-auditioned string (winds and percussion will be allowed when appropriate) ensemble open to all members of the college community. The course includes the study and performance of significant string literature. May be repeated for credit.

MUS 207

  

Concert Band

  

(1)

  

Concert band is a non-auditioned instrumental ensemble open to all members of the college community. The course includes the study and performance of significant concert band literature. May be repeated for credit.

For information on additional ensembles at area colleges and universities, please call the Department of Music at (574) 284-4632.

Philosophy

PHIL 291 Dialogue and Civil Discourse (1)
Building a strong community means engaging with people whose backgrounds, beliefs and experiences are different from yours.  In this course, students will develop skills to engage in constructive dialogue with others who have different views on social and political issues.  The class will discuss  a controversial contemporary issue each week (for example: abortion, free speech on campus, immigration, the 2nd Amendment and gun control).  Readings will consist of contemporary media articles drawn from a range of sources and viewpoints. Students will investigate their own core assumptions and beliefs about key issues and will listen to the views and experiences of others in the class. This course satisfies LO3 Social Responsibility and LO3 Intercultural Competence but does not fulfill an LO1 requirement.  Section 73302 is offered for first-year students only.

Physical Education

The Physical Education Department offers selected activity courses based on student needs and interests. These courses are offered throughout the day and week to satisfy a broad range of fitness interests.

The HIIT Bootcamp/Kickboxing class is a great option for students focused on a high intensity cardio, strength, and core conditioning workout with kickboxing moves. If you are drawn to cardio dance, WERQ is for you! This wildly addictive cardio dance class is based on the hottest pop and hip hop music. The workout is nonstop with repetitive athletic moves and fresh dance steps.

Physical education classes and participation in intercollegiate athletics carry one-half semester hour of elective credit. One semester hour of credit may be applied to graduation. The following courses are available each semester:

 

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