How to Write a Business Introduction Letter (With Examples) – Feb 29th

Because the letter makes a few claims (e.g., a 30% acquisition cost reduction), the full proposal should explain how the seller arrived at each number. This is a great example, but keep in mind that it lacks two key elements: an adequate CTA and a signature. We recommend including both.

Free Business Proposal Letter TemplateFree Business Proposal Letter Template

How to Write a Business Introduction Letter (With Examples)

When a business is expanding its market, or it wants to communicate with another company or organization, it might send out a business introduction letter. This can help show potential customers or other organizations what a business does, what products and services it offers and how it can help the market or other related businesses.

However, there are several elements to include in a business introduction letter, especially between audiences, such as consumers or other corporations. In this article, you will learn how to write a business introduction letter with templates and examples.

What is a business introduction letter?

A business introduction letter is a way for companies to introduce themselves to potential customers, partner businesses, distributors, investors or other individuals or organizations to describe products or services that they offer. Additionally, company introduction letters may be categorized as either business-to-business, where a company writes to another business, and business-to-customer, where the business writes to its market or clientele.

A business-to-business letter of introduction might commonly be used by businesses introducing their products, services or intent to another business. The intent behind this type of business introduction letter may be to describe a possible partnership, request investment opportunities, or, if a company’s niche market is other businesses, they might use an introduction letter to describe the products and services that they offer.

A company might use a business-to-customer, or business-to-consumer, introduction letter to introduce a sale, new products, discounted services or alert a specific market to a new company’s arrival.

What style considerations are common in business writing?

Business writers tend to prioritize clear and concise communication. When writing in business, carefully considering the following style elements, along with your purpose and audience, can help you communicate more effectively:

Active voice. One skill in business writing is how to tactfully take ownership or distribute blame for certain actions. Active voice refers to a sentence structure that places the actor of the sentence as its grammatical subject. In general, active voice comes across as clearer, more direct, and more concise than passive voice, which are all elements of good business writing. However, the passive voice can be a useful tool in legally-sensitive writing, because the passive voice can convey what has occurred without naming names.

Jargon. Generally, your audience will prefer plain, straightforward language over jargon, because it allows them to read your writing quickly without misunderstandings. However, you may encounter what looks like jargon. Ask yourself if this language may be functioning as shorthand or whether it’s helping establish expectations or norms in business relationships. Understanding your audience and why they may choose to either use or avoid jargon will help you determine what is most appropriate for your own writing.

Tone. While business writing should be clear and concise, “concise” does not necessarily mean “blunt.” As you write, think about how your relationship to the reader and about how your audience may interpret your tone. Consider the following examples:

Nobody liked your project idea, so we are not going to give you any funding.
After carefully reviewing this proposal, we have decided to prioritize other projects this quarter.

While the first example may be more direct, you will likely notice that the second sentence is more diplomatic and respectful than the first version, which is unnecessarily harsh and likely to provoke a negative reaction.

Standard Business Proposal Letter Format

Check out each of the major components of an effective business proposal letter below, starting with business headings, continuing on with an introduction, statement of purpose, and call-to-action, and wrapping up with a strong outro.

Headings

Introduction

Statement of Purpose

Call-to-Action

Outro

Business headings provide a formal touch for your business proposal letter and include contact information for your business as well as the recipients, such as the business name, address, and points of contact. For more informal business proposal letters or proposal letters you send via email, you can consider omitting this portion of your letter.

Your introduction is an opportunity to re-introduce yourself and remind your lead, prospect, or recipient why you’re sending the associated proposal. This also gives you a chance to provide any relevant social proof to prime them before reading your full proposal, as well as tease the overall purpose.

This acts as a summary of the most important contents of your business proposal: their problem, your solution, and the benefits the prospect will receive. This gives you a chance to highlight the most important points of your proposal and accurately communicate your elevator pitch or USP for the scanning reader.

Conclude with a sentence that tells the reader what to do next. Usually, this next step will be to read your attached proposal, but it can also be to request a call or meeting to review the proposal together or to ask and answer any questions that may have arisen after reviewing. If this is the case, use concrete language with a specific ask, such as “use my Calendly link to book a time to connect this week.”

End with a polite outro stating how excited you are about the opportunity to work together. Then, sign the document if it’s a physical copy, or use a professional email signature if you’re sending it via email. Include your contact information in the signature so they can reach you.

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To write a business letter to customers, use a professional-looking letterhead that features your business name or logo. Open with a polite salutation and state the purpose of the letter right away in the first line. To establish an assertive tone, be sure to write in the active voice, adding any relevant details to clarify the letter’s purpose. Wrap up your letter with a call to action and don’t forget to proofread the letter carefully before sending it out! For more tips on writing in the active voice, read on!

References:

https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/how-to-write-business-introduction-letter
https://www.indeed.com/career-advice/career-development/how-to-write-business-introduction-letter
https://writingcenter.unc.edu/tips-and-tools/business-letters/
https://sellingsignals.com/business-proposal-letter/
https://www.wikihow.com/Write-a-Business-Letter-to-Customers