[PDF] EE 2315 Circuit Analysis I – Free Download PDF

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Lecture Schedule Week/Date

Monday

Wednesday

Reading Assignment

6-7/9

Electrical quantities, system of units, charge and energy, current and voltage, power and energy.

Network models, circuit elements, resistors, independent voltage and current sources, Ohm’s law, meters, dependent voltage and current sources.

Chapter 1 – 1.2 to 1.8

6-14/16

Transducers, switches, Kirchhoff’s laws, series and parallel resistors, divider circuits, source dominance, PSPICE.

Mesh analysis matrix equation (MAME).

Chapter 2 – 2.1 to 2.9 Chapter 3 – 3.1 to 3.6 Handouts

3

6-21/23

Node analysis matrix equation (NAME).

Source transformations, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, maximum power transfer.

Chapter 4 – 4.1 to 4.8 Handouts

4

6-28/30

Mid-term Exam 1

Chapter 5 – 5.1 to 5.6 Chapter 6 – 6.1 to 6.7

5

7-5/7

1

2

The operational amplifier (opamp), ideal and non-ideal opamp, node analysis. Energy storage elements, capacitors, energy stored in capacitors, series and parallel capacitors.

6

7-12/14

Initial conditions in switched circuits, op-amps and RC circuits.

7

7-19/21

Circuits with two energy storage elements, 2nd order differential equations.

8

7-26/28

Concept of state, state variable circuit analysis, sinusoidal sources.

9

8-2/4

Mid-term Exam 2

10

8-9/11

Mesh and node circuit analysis using phasors, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s equivalents, source transformations.

11

8-16

Final Exam

Inductors, energy stored in inductors, series and parallel inductors. First-order RC and RL circuits, constant input, sequential switching, non-constant input, differential operators. Natural, forced, and complete response of a critically-damped parallel RLC circuit. Steady-state response of an RL circuit to a sinusoidal excitation, complex exponential forcing function. Phasors, phasor relationships for RLC elements, impedance and admittance, Kirchhoff’s laws using phasors. Electric power, maximum power transfer, instantaneous, average, and complex power, power factor.

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Chapter 7 – 7.1 to 7.4

Chapter 7 – 7.5 to 7.9 Chapter 8 – 8.1 to 8.8 Chapter 9 – 9.1 to 9.5 Chapter 9 – 9.6 to 9.9 Chapter 10 – 10.1 to 10.3

Chapter 10 – 10.6 to 10.5

Chapter 10 – 10.4 to 10.13 Chapter 11 – 11.1 to 11.8

Lecture Topic Details 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

6

7.

8.

Review of algebra and linear algebra concepts Fundamentals a. Quantities and variables 1. Electron energy and charge 2. Voltage and current 3. Energy and power 4. Polarities and units b. Laws 1. Voltage-current relationship (Ohm’s law) 2. Conservation of charge transfer (Kirchhoff’s current law KCL) 3. Continuity of voltage (Kirchhoff’s voltage law KVL) Voltage and current sources a. Independent sources 1. Voltage sources i. Types and symbols ii. IV characteristics iii. Batteries 2. Current sources i. Types and symbols ii. IV characteristics b. Dependent (controlled) sources 1. Voltage sources i. VCVS ii. CCVS 2. Current sources i. VCCS ii. CCCS Resistors and simple resistor networks a. Resistance and conductance; construction, symbol, units b. Series connection 1. Voltage divider c. Parallel connection 1. Current divider Network theorems I a. Source dominance b. Source combinations c. Source shifting 1. e-shift operation 2. i-shift operation d. Source transformations 1. Voltage to current 2. Current to voltage Network theorems II a. Superposition b. Thevenin’s theorem c. Norton’s theorem Application of network theorems to simple networks a. Reduction operations b. Elimination operation c. Equivalence operations Vectors and matrices a. Definitions b. Mathematical operations c. Special matrices d. Matrix inverse e. Rank and equivalence -3-

9. 10.

11. 12. 13. 14.

System of linear equations a. Dependence and independence b. Solutions of systems of simultaneous linear equations Elementary graph theory a. Network-graph transformation b. Definitions c. The incidence matrix and incidence submatrix d. The circuit matrix and mesh circuit submatrix e. Determining the exact number of independent equations f. Determining the correct equations Obtaining the system of network mesh-analysis equations a. Direct application of KVL, KCL, and Ohm’s law b. Expressing the equations in vector-matrix format Obtaining the system of network node-analysis equations a. Direct application of KVL, KCL, and Ohm’s law b. Expressing the equations in vector-matrix format Algorithms for generating matrix analysis equations a. Mesh-analysis matrix equation (MAME) b. Node-analysis matrix equation (NAME) Energy storage components a. The capacitor 1. Construction and symbol 2. Charge-voltage (CV) relationship 3. Current-voltage (IV) relationship 4. Definition of capacitance 5. Energy storage capacity b. The inductor 1. Construction and symbol 2. Flux linkage-current (λI) relationship 3. Current-voltage (IV) relationship 4. Definition of inductance 5. Energy storage capacity

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References: 1. F.T. Ulaby and M.M. Maharbiz, Circuits, National Technology and Science Press, 2009, ISBN 978-1-934891-00-1 2. Thomas L. Floyd, Electric Circuits Fundamentals, 7th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2007, ISBN 0-13-219710-3 3. Robert T. Paynter and B.J. Toby Boydell, Electronics Technology Fundamentals: Electron Flow Version, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2009, ISBN 0-13-501345-3 4. Allan R. Hambley, Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications, 3rd Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2005, ISBN 0-13-147046-9 5. J. David Irwin and R. Mark Nelms, Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2005, ISBN 0-471-48728-7 General Class Information: 1. There are 21 class meetings scheduled for the 11 weeks of the Summer 2011 Semester. Eighteen of these meetings are devoted to class lectures and three devoted to examinations – two mid-terms and one final. 2. Mid-term examinations will be given on the 4th and 9th weeks, and will be two hour written exercises. 3. The final examination will be given on the 17th week and will be a comprehensive written examination. NOTICE: The UTA registrar has demanded a firm, unforgivable final date (one calendar day after the last final examination date) for the submission of course grades from all instructors. Because of this rigid schedule, the date and time scheduled for the final examination (Tuesday August 16, 2011, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm) is fixed and will not be changed for any reason. Therefore, all students, without exception, must take the final examination at this time. 4. All examinations will be pencil, paper, and calculator exercises. All students will take these exams at the scheduled times in the classroom. Note that devices such as cell phones, computers, PDAs, and others that have wired or wireless communication capability are not allowed in the class room during exams. 5. There will be absolutely no late or make-up mid-term or final examination given unless a written request has been submitted to and approved by the instructor at least two weeks prior to the examination date. As a rule, make-up examinations are several orders of magnitude more difficult than examinations given on the scheduled dates. Please be advised that illness or any other absence on the examination date does not constitute a valid reason for a make-up examination. 6. There will be five to six homework assignments, usually given on one or two-week intervals. Each assignment requires about five to ten hours for completion. These assignments will be graded and will be included as part of your total course grade. Past experience has shown that students who spend the necessary time to work these assignments usually do quite well on the examinations. Solutions to homework problems will be e-mailed to all students by the end of the day the assignment is due. Homework turned in after the solutions have been sent out will not be counted and will receive a grade of zero. 7. The total grade for this course is based upon the homework (HW), two mid-term exams (MTE1 and MTE2), and the final exam (FE) grades. The total grade is computed from Total grade = 0.1*HW + 0.25*(MTE1 + MTE2) + 0.4*FE The letter grade is based on the range of the total grade shown below. Percentage for Grades Total grade range Letter grade 88% – 100% A 75% – 87% B 63% – 74% C 50% – 62% D 0% – 49% F 8.

9.

In order to adhere to current privacy law requirements, class grades will not be posted. If you wish to receive your final examination paper and/or your class grade prior to their mailing by the registrar, please give me a large selfaddressed and adequately stamped envelope prior to the final examination date so that I may mail your papers and grade to you. Office hours are posted outside my office (NH526). If you have any questions and/or adverse difficulty with the lectures or class material, I strongly suggest that you call or e-mail me (during regular working hours, of course). If necessary, a scheduled office visit can be arranged. -5-

Drop Policy: Please refer to the University policy for dropping courses. Americans With Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation; reference Public Law 92-112 – The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. With the passage of federal legislation entitled Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens. As a faculty member, I am required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty of their need for accommodation and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels. Information regarding specific diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability. Also, you may visit the Office for Students with Disabilities in room 102 of University Hall or call them at (817) 272-3364. Student Support Services Available: The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at (817) 272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals. Final Review Week: A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabi. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. Classes are held as scheduled during this week and lectures and presentations may be given. E-Culture Policy: The University of Texas at Arlington has adopted the University email address as an official means of communication with students. Through the use of email, UT-Arlington is able to provide students with relevant and timely information, designed to facilitate student success. In particular, important information concerning registration, financial aid, payment of bills, and graduation may be sent to students through email. All students are assigned an email account and information about activating and using it is available at www.uta.edu/email. New students (first semester at UTA) are able to activate their email account 24 hours after registering for courses. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, and it remains active as long as a student is enrolled at UT-Arlington. Students are responsible for checking their email regularly. Ethics: Student Responsibility Undergraduate and graduate students assume full responsibility for knowledge of all University rules, regulations and deadlines published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs and of all departmental and program requirements concerning their degree programs. Academic Dishonesty All students are expected to pursue their academic careers with honesty and integrity. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on a test or other coursework, plagiarism (offering the work of another as one's own) and unauthorized collaboration with another person. Students found responsible for dishonesty in their academic pursuits are subject to penalties that may range from disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion from the University. In accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System (Part One, Chapter VI), institutional procedures regarding allegations of academic dishonesty are outlined in Part Two, Chapter 2, of the U.T. Arlington Handbook of Operating Procedures. This information may be obtained by accessing the Dean of Students' Web site at www.uta.edu/studentaffairs/dos or the Student Judicial Affairs' Web site at

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www.uta.edu/studentaffairs/judicial affairs. Copies of each regulation can be obtained in the Dean of Students' Office on the lower level of the University Center. Definitions (UTA Handbook of Operating Procedures) F. scholastic dishonesty, including, but not limited to, cheating on an examination or an assignment, plagiarism, and collusion; 1.

2. 3.

cheating on an examination or an assignment includes: a. copying the work of another, engaging in written, oral or any other means of communication with another, or giving aid to or seeking aid from another when not permitted by the instructor; b. using material during an examination or when completing an assignment that is not authorized by the person giving the examination or making the work assignment; c. taking or attempting to take an examination for another, or allowing another to take or attempt to take an examination for a student; d. using, obtaining, or attempting to obtain by any means, the whole or any part of an un-administered examination or work assignment; e. any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such an act; plagiarism means the unacknowledged incorporation of the work of another in work that is offered for credit; collusion means the unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing work that is offered for credit.

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-8-

The following is an excerpt from the College of Engineering's statement on Ethics, Professionalism, and Conduct of Engineering Students. Read the statement carefully, sign it, and return it to your instructor. You may make a copy for your records. Additional copies of this statement can be obtained from your instructor or the Office of the Dean of Engineering. STATEMENT ON ETHICS, PROFESSIONALISM, AND CONDUCT FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON The College cannot and will not tolerate any form of academic dishonesty by its students. This includes, but is not limited to cheating on examination, plagiarism, or collusion. Cheating on an examination includes: 1. Copying from another's paper, any means of communication with another during examination, giving aid to or receiving aid from another during examination; 2. Using any material during examination that is unauthorized by the proctor; 3. Taking or attempting to take an examination for another student or allowing another student to take or attempt to take an examination for oneself. 4. Using, obtaining, or attempting to obtain by any means the whole or any part of an un-administered examination. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged incorporation of another's work into work which the student offers for credit. Collusion is the unauthorized collaboration of another in preparing work that a student offers for credit. I have read and I understand the above statement. In addition, I understand that, in order to ensure fairness to all students, exams will be proctored and possibly videotaped. Course and section number:

____EE 2315-001____________________

Date:

___________________________________

Student's signature:

___________________________________

Student's name, printed:

___________________________________

Student’s ID number:

___________________________________

Student’s e-mail address: (please print clearly)

___________________________________

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EE 2315 Circuit Analysis I Summer 2011 Dr. Howard T. Russell, Jr. Office: Nedderman Hall 526 (817) 272-3154 [email protected] Catalog Course Description: EE 2315 CIRCUIT ANALYSIS I (3-0) Basic circuit concepts of R, L, and C components. Kirchhoff's laws, resistive network analysis, power calculations, loop and node equations, topology, basic network theorems. Dependent sources and operational amplifiers. Computer-assisted solution of circuit problems. Elementary transient analysis. Steady state A-C phasor analysis, including element laws and phasor diagrams. Prerequisite: Grade C or better in MATH 2425. Corequisite: MATH 2326, PHYS 1444. Topics: EE 2315 is the first complete course on electric circuit theory and analysis. The course begins with topics on basic electrical engineering quantities and variables and quickly progresses into a review of the fundamental network laws (Ohm’s and Kirchhoff’s). Following this review is an introduction into voltage and current sources. Resistors and basic resistor networks and operations are covered next. A set of network theorems are developed from the application of the fundamental laws on resistive networks. Matrix methods are applied to the generation and solution of a system of linear network equations (MAME and NAME). The second part of the course begins with the introduction into energy storage elements – the capacitor and the inductor. The behavioral characteristics of the elements in the time-domain are explored with the application of differential equations on the analysis equations. Complete time-domain solutions of first and second order network are developed. The course ends with the application of steady-state concepts on RLC networks, and the development and application of phasors. Prerequisite: MATH 2425; co-requisite: MATH 2326, PHYS 1444. Textbook: R.C. Dorf and J.A. Svoboda, Introduction to Electric Circuits, 6th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2004, ISBN 0-47144795-1 Tools: 1. The latest Acrobat Viewer by Adobe (http://www.adobe.com) 2. A good web browser. 3. A scientific calculator (TI-89). Times and Location: Lecture – Tuesday and Thursday, 10:30 am to 12:20 pm, Nedderman Hall room 203. Instructor: Dr. Howard T. Russell, Jr. [email protected] Nedderman Hall 526 (817) 272-3154-1-Lecture Schedule Week/DateMondayWednesdayReading Assignment6-7/9Electrical quantities, system of units, charge and energy, current and voltage, power and energy.Network models, circuit elements, resistors, independent voltage and current sources, Ohm’s law, meters, dependent voltage and current sources.Chapter 1 – 1.2 to 1.86-14/16Transducers, switches, Kirchhoff’s laws, series and parallel resistors, divider circuits, source dominance, PSPICE.Mesh analysis matrix equation (MAME).Chapter 2 – 2.1 to 2.9 Chapter 3 – 3.1 to 3.6 Handouts6-21/23Node analysis matrix equation (NAME).Source transformations, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s theorems, maximum power transfer.Chapter 4 – 4.1 to 4.8 Handouts6-28/30Mid-term Exam 1Chapter 5 – 5.1 to 5.6 Chapter 6 – 6.1 to 6.77-5/7The operational amplifier (opamp), ideal and non-ideal opamp, node analysis. Energy storage elements, capacitors, energy stored in capacitors, series and parallel capacitors.7-12/14Initial conditions in switched circuits, op-amps and RC circuits.7-19/21Circuits with two energy storage elements, 2nd order differential equations.7-26/28Concept of state, state variable circuit analysis, sinusoidal sources.8-2/4Mid-term Exam 2108-9/11Mesh and node circuit analysis using phasors, superposition, Thevenin’s and Norton’s equivalents, source transformations.118-16Final ExamInductors, energy stored in inductors, series and parallel inductors. First-order RC and RL circuits, constant input, sequential switching, non-constant input, differential operators. Natural, forced, and complete response of a critically-damped parallel RLC circuit. Steady-state response of an RL circuit to a sinusoidal excitation, complex exponential forcing function. Phasors, phasor relationships for RLC elements, impedance and admittance, Kirchhoff’s laws using phasors. Electric power, maximum power transfer, instantaneous, average, and complex power, power factor.-2-Chapter 7 – 7.1 to 7.4Chapter 7 – 7.5 to 7.9 Chapter 8 – 8.1 to 8.8 Chapter 9 – 9.1 to 9.5 Chapter 9 – 9.6 to 9.9 Chapter 10 – 10.1 to 10.3Chapter 10 – 10.6 to 10.5Chapter 10 – 10.4 to 10.13 Chapter 11 – 11.1 to 11.8Lecture Topic Details 1. 2.3.4.5.7.8.Review of algebra and linear algebra concepts Fundamentals a. Quantities and variables 1. Electron energy and charge 2. Voltage and current 3. Energy and power 4. Polarities and units b. Laws 1. Voltage-current relationship (Ohm’s law) 2. Conservation of charge transfer (Kirchhoff’s current law KCL) 3. Continuity of voltage (Kirchhoff’s voltage law KVL) Voltage and current sources a. Independent sources 1. Voltage sources i. Types and symbols ii. IV characteristics iii. Batteries 2. Current sources i. Types and symbols ii. IV characteristics b. Dependent (controlled) sources 1. Voltage sources i. VCVS ii. CCVS 2. Current sources i. VCCS ii. CCCS Resistors and simple resistor networks a. Resistance and conductance; construction, symbol, units b. Series connection 1. Voltage divider c. Parallel connection 1. Current divider Network theorems I a. Source dominance b. Source combinations c. Source shifting 1. e-shift operation 2. i-shift operation d. Source transformations 1. Voltage to current 2. Current to voltage Network theorems II a. Superposition b. Thevenin’s theorem c. Norton’s theorem Application of network theorems to simple networks a. Reduction operations b. Elimination operation c. Equivalence operations Vectors and matrices a. Definitions b. Mathematical operations c. Special matrices d. Matrix inverse e. Rank and equivalence -3-9. 10.11. 12. 13. 14.System of linear equations a. Dependence and independence b. Solutions of systems of simultaneous linear equations Elementary graph theory a. Network-graph transformation b. Definitions c. The incidence matrix and incidence submatrix d. The circuit matrix and mesh circuit submatrix e. Determining the exact number of independent equations f. Determining the correct equations Obtaining the system of network mesh-analysis equations a. Direct application of KVL, KCL, and Ohm’s law b. Expressing the equations in vector-matrix format Obtaining the system of network node-analysis equations a. Direct application of KVL, KCL, and Ohm’s law b. Expressing the equations in vector-matrix format Algorithms for generating matrix analysis equations a. Mesh-analysis matrix equation (MAME) b. Node-analysis matrix equation (NAME) Energy storage components a. The capacitor 1. Construction and symbol 2. Charge-voltage (CV) relationship 3. Current-voltage (IV) relationship 4. Definition of capacitance 5. Energy storage capacity b. The inductor 1. Construction and symbol 2. Flux linkage-current (λI) relationship 3. Current-voltage (IV) relationship 4. Definition of inductance 5. Energy storage capacity-4-References: 1. F.T. Ulaby and M.M. Maharbiz, Circuits, National Technology and Science Press, 2009, ISBN 978-1-934891-00-1 2. Thomas L. Floyd, Electric Circuits Fundamentals, 7th Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2007, ISBN 0-13-219710-3 3. Robert T. Paynter and B.J. Toby Boydell, Electronics Technology Fundamentals: Electron Flow Version, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2009, ISBN 0-13-501345-3 4. Allan R. Hambley, Electrical Engineering: Principles and Applications, 3rd Edition, Pearson Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, NJ, 2005, ISBN 0-13-147046-9 5. J. David Irwin and R. Mark Nelms, Basic Engineering Circuit Analysis, 8th Edition, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2005, ISBN 0-471-48728-7 General Class Information: 1. There are 21 class meetings scheduled for the 11 weeks of the Summer 2011 Semester. Eighteen of these meetings are devoted to class lectures and three devoted to examinations – two mid-terms and one final. 2. Mid-term examinations will be given on the 4th and 9th weeks, and will be two hour written exercises. 3. The final examination will be given on the 17th week and will be a comprehensive written examination. NOTICE: The UTA registrar has demanded a firm, unforgivable final date (one calendar day after the last final examination date) for the submission of course grades from all instructors. Because of this rigid schedule, the date and time scheduled for the final examination (Tuesday August 16, 2011, 10:30 am to 12:30 pm) is fixed and will not be changed for any reason. Therefore, all students, without exception, must take the final examination at this time. 4. All examinations will be pencil, paper, and calculator exercises. All students will take these exams at the scheduled times in the classroom. Note that devices such as cell phones, computers, PDAs, and others that have wired or wireless communication capability are not allowed in the class room during exams. 5. There will be absolutely no late or make-up mid-term or final examination given unless a written request has been submitted to and approved by the instructor at least two weeks prior to the examination date. As a rule, make-up examinations are several orders of magnitude more difficult than examinations given on the scheduled dates. Please be advised that illness or any other absence on the examination date does not constitute a valid reason for a make-up examination. 6. There will be five to six homework assignments, usually given on one or two-week intervals. Each assignment requires about five to ten hours for completion. These assignments will be graded and will be included as part of your total course grade. Past experience has shown that students who spend the necessary time to work these assignments usually do quite well on the examinations. Solutions to homework problems will be e-mailed to all students by the end of the day the assignment is due. Homework turned in after the solutions have been sent out will not be counted and will receive a grade of zero. 7. The total grade for this course is based upon the homework (HW), two mid-term exams (MTE1 and MTE2), and the final exam (FE) grades. The total grade is computed from Total grade = 0.1*HW + 0.25*(MTE1 + MTE2) + 0.4*FE The letter grade is based on the range of the total grade shown below. Percentage for Grades Total grade range Letter grade 88% – 100% A 75% – 87% B 63% – 74% C 50% – 62% D 0% – 49% F 8.9.In order to adhere to current privacy law requirements, class grades will not be posted. If you wish to receive your final examination paper and/or your class grade prior to their mailing by the registrar, please give me a large selfaddressed and adequately stamped envelope prior to the final examination date so that I may mail your papers and grade to you. Office hours are posted outside my office (NH526). If you have any questions and/or adverse difficulty with the lectures or class material, I strongly suggest that you call or e-mail me (during regular working hours, of course). If necessary, a scheduled office visit can be arranged. -5-Drop Policy: Please refer to the University policy for dropping courses. Americans With Disabilities Act: The University of Texas at Arlington is on record as being committed to both the spirit and letter of federal equal opportunity legislation; reference Public Law 92-112 – The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 as amended. With the passage of federal legislation entitled Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), pursuant to section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, there is renewed focus on providing this population with the same opportunities enjoyed by all citizens. As a faculty member, I am required by law to provide "reasonable accommodations" to students with disabilities, so as not to discriminate on the basis of that disability. Student responsibility primarily rests with informing faculty of their need for accommodation and in providing authorized documentation through designated administrative channels. Information regarding specific diagnostic criteria and policies for obtaining academic accommodations can be found at www.uta.edu/disability. Also, you may visit the Office for Students with Disabilities in room 102 of University Hall or call them at (817) 272-3364. Student Support Services Available: The University of Texas at Arlington supports a variety of student success programs to help you connect with the University and achieve academic success. These programs include learning assistance, developmental education, advising and mentoring, admission and transition, and federally funded programs. Students requiring assistance academically, personally, or socially should contact the Office of Student Success Programs at (817) 272-6107 for more information and appropriate referrals. Final Review Week: A period of five class days prior to the first day of final examinations in the long sessions shall be designated as Final Review Week. The purpose of this week is to allow students sufficient time to prepare for final examinations. During this week, there shall be no scheduled activities such as required field trips or performances; and no instructor shall assign any themes, research problems or exercises of similar scope that have a completion date during or following this week unless specified in the class syllabi. During Final Review Week, an instructor shall not give any examinations constituting 10% or more of the final grade, except makeup tests and laboratory examinations. In addition, no instructor shall give any portion of the final examination during Final Review Week. Classes are held as scheduled during this week and lectures and presentations may be given. E-Culture Policy: The University of Texas at Arlington has adopted the University email address as an official means of communication with students. Through the use of email, UT-Arlington is able to provide students with relevant and timely information, designed to facilitate student success. In particular, important information concerning registration, financial aid, payment of bills, and graduation may be sent to students through email. All students are assigned an email account and information about activating and using it is available at www.uta.edu/email. New students (first semester at UTA) are able to activate their email account 24 hours after registering for courses. There is no additional charge to students for using this account, and it remains active as long as a student is enrolled at UT-Arlington. Students are responsible for checking their email regularly. Ethics: Student Responsibility Undergraduate and graduate students assume full responsibility for knowledge of all University rules, regulations and deadlines published in the Undergraduate and Graduate Catalogs and of all departmental and program requirements concerning their degree programs. Academic Dishonesty All students are expected to pursue their academic careers with honesty and integrity. Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to, cheating on a test or other coursework, plagiarism (offering the work of another as one's own) and unauthorized collaboration with another person. Students found responsible for dishonesty in their academic pursuits are subject to penalties that may range from disciplinary probation, suspension or expulsion from the University. In accordance with the Rules and Regulations of the Board of Regents of The University of Texas System (Part One, Chapter VI), institutional procedures regarding allegations of academic dishonesty are outlined in Part Two, Chapter 2, of the U.T. Arlington Handbook of Operating Procedures. This information may be obtained by accessing the Dean of Students' Web site at www.uta.edu/studentaffairs/dos or the Student Judicial Affairs' Web site at-6-www.uta.edu/studentaffairs/judicial affairs. Copies of each regulation can be obtained in the Dean of Students' Office on the lower level of the University Center. Definitions (UTA Handbook of Operating Procedures) F. scholastic dishonesty, including, but not limited to, cheating on an examination or an assignment, plagiarism, and collusion; 1.2. 3.cheating on an examination or an assignment includes: a. copying the work of another, engaging in written, oral or any other means of communication with another, or giving aid to or seeking aid from another when not permitted by the instructor; b. using material during an examination or when completing an assignment that is not authorized by the person giving the examination or making the work assignment; c. taking or attempting to take an examination for another, or allowing another to take or attempt to take an examination for a student; d. using, obtaining, or attempting to obtain by any means, the whole or any part of an un-administered examination or work assignment; e. any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such an act; plagiarism means the unacknowledged incorporation of the work of another in work that is offered for credit; collusion means the unauthorized collaboration with another in preparing work that is offered for credit.-7–8-The following is an excerpt from the College of Engineering's statement on Ethics, Professionalism, and Conduct of Engineering Students. Read the statement carefully, sign it, and return it to your instructor. You may make a copy for your records. Additional copies of this statement can be obtained from your instructor or the Office of the Dean of Engineering. STATEMENT ON ETHICS, PROFESSIONALISM, AND CONDUCT FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING THE UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT ARLINGTON The College cannot and will not tolerate any form of academic dishonesty by its students. This includes, but is not limited to cheating on examination, plagiarism, or collusion. Cheating on an examination includes: 1. Copying from another's paper, any means of communication with another during examination, giving aid to or receiving aid from another during examination; 2. Using any material during examination that is unauthorized by the proctor; 3. Taking or attempting to take an examination for another student or allowing another student to take or attempt to take an examination for oneself. 4. Using, obtaining, or attempting to obtain by any means the whole or any part of an un-administered examination. Plagiarism is the unacknowledged incorporation of another's work into work which the student offers for credit. Collusion is the unauthorized collaboration of another in preparing work that a student offers for credit. I have read and I understand the above statement. In addition, I understand that, in order to ensure fairness to all students, exams will be proctored and possibly videotaped. Course and section number:____EE 2315-001____________________Date:___________________________________Student's signature:___________________________________Student's name, printed:___________________________________Student’s ID number:___________________________________Student’s e-mail address: (please print clearly)___________________________________-9-