Summer Semester | Assumption University

Assumption's online and summer day courses provide you the opportunity to complete a semester-long course in six weeks with smaller class sizes at a reduced cost per course. Whether a student seeks to accelerate his/ her degree program, catch up, or simply focus on a particular course, this is an opportunity worth exploring. Online registration will open in March 2022.

The courses offered during the summer are the same versions as their fall or spring semester counterparts, taught by the same professors, and provide the same level of intellectual rigor. As such, no special permission is needed for Assumption students to “count” these courses as part of their curriculum. The only real difference is the summer classes cost less than the fall and spring versions.

All courses are three credits, except where noted.

Summer Session I Course Descriptions 

ACC 125K PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I
An introduction to accounting concepts for financial reporting. Accounting theories and principles relative to asset valuation, liability reporting, and income determination will be examined. The uses and limitations of external financial reports will be emphasized. (Fall, Spring) 

ARH 125K HISTORY OF WESTERN ART 
How long have humans been creating art? What makes the Mona Lisa the Mona Lisa? Why is Picasso so famous? This course answers such questions by surveying the development of art in the West from prehistoric times to the present day. Through illustrated lectures and in-class discussion we will consider what purposes art serves, why it changes, and how artistic change is linked to political and social developments. At the same time, close study of individual works will introduce the skills needed to identify works of art and decode the imagery they contain. This course fulfills the Core requirement for a Fine Art class in Culture and Expression. It also serves as a gateway to a minor in Art History. 

BUS 100K  INTRODUCTION TO EXCEL
This course will familiarize students with selected features of the Microsoft Excel spreadsheet program. Basic skills learned can be adapted for use in courses involving business, accounting, statistics, science, math, and other areas. Applied problems from various fields will be used as examples. Prerequisite: Math placement at the level of MAT 114 or higher or completion of MAT 111.

CRM 130K INTRODUCTION TO THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM
This survey level course introduces students to the purpose, structure, and function of the criminal justice system, which represents the government’s official response to crime. Students will learn about the role of the various aspects of the criminal justice system (i.e., law enforcement, courts, and corrections) in responding to and controlling crime. A significant focus of the class will be on critical analysis of criminal justice policy and programs, such as mandatory minimum sentences for drug offenses, New York City’s stop and frisk campaign, sex offender residency restrictions, mandatory arrest laws for domestic violence, day reporting centers for probationers and parolees, and victimless prosecution of domestic violence cases. The course will also force students to consider the challenges facing the criminal justice system, including an aging prison population, the impact of incarceration on families and communities, the pressure to efficiently process high caseloads, and protecting personal liberties while keeping citizens safe. This course counts in the Core Curriculum as a social science in either Scientific and Quantitative Reasoning or Person and Society. 

CYB 115K CYBERSECURITY FUNDAMENTALS
This course provides a bird’s eye view of the evolving cyberspace ecosystem, the interoperability of physical and social networks, and methods and techniques in securing that ecosystem. Students will explore the ethical, legal, and technical aspects of cybercrime and methods of prevention, detection, response and recovery.  The value of strong moral character, integrity, and trust as prized attributes of cybersecurity practitioners will be highlighted. Students will be introduced to essential cybersecurity topics including operating system models and mechanisms for mandatory and discretionary controls, data models, basic cryptography and its applications, security in computer networks and distributed systems, inspection and protection of information assets, detection of and reaction to threats to information assets, and examination of pre- and post-incident procedures, technical and managerial responses, an overview of the information security planning and staffing functions, data mining and data science, and policy and assurance issues. The advantages and inherent value of being prepared as a life-long learner with a strong liberal-arts background will be emphasized with the opportunity for students to complete a service-learning project tailored to their academic/career goals. No prior computer programming experience is required. Basic competency in computer operation is required. 

ECO 115K STATISTICS 
This course is an introduction to statistical methods used in behavioral research. The course will cover both inferential and descriptive statistics, with an emphasis on the conceptual understanding of how to use statistics to summarize and evaluate information. This course counts as a second Math course in the Core curriculum. 

ENG 130K ENGLISH COMPOSITION 
This writing course emphasizes planning, composing, and revising. Specifically, the course deals with strategies for generating ideas, recognizing audience, clarifying purpose, focusing on a perspective, and choosing effective arrangements of ideas. Techniques of revision, which are central to the course, focus on appropriateness of language and effectiveness of development, as well as on editing. Counts in the Core Curriculum as a Core Seminar, to be taken in the same year as LTE 140, in either order. 

ENG 221K BRITISH LITERATURE I: BEGINNINGS TO THE 19TH CENTURY 
This course provides a broad overview of English literature from the Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. We will read a variety of texts, construct historical and cultural contexts, debate issues of periodization and canonization, and consider questions of genre and innovation. Prerequisite: ENG 130 and any Introduction to Literature.  

HRS 121K HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND DISABILITY ACROSS THE LIFESPAN
This course will cover the basic principles of developmental theories in addition to the major theories of human growth and development. Piaget, Erikson, Bronfenbrenner, Maslow, and Kohlberg are some of the theorists studied in this course. Demographic shifts across history are identified with the intent of demonstrating the increased population of individuals living and living longer with chronic illness and disability. Typical development across the lifespan is studied with each stage of life covered from pregnancy and infancy to older adulthood. Disabilities and chronic illnesses common to each stage of life will be studied with discussion of the ways in which the disability and illness experience affects passage through life stages. This course fulfills the social science requirement in the Core Curriculum.

LTE 140K INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 
This course is designed to acquaint the students with the form and structure of various genres of literature. Readings are mainly drawn from English and American literature. Class discussion and writing assignments will make use of such critical concepts as point of view, imagery, and tone. Counts in the Core Curriculum as a Core Seminar, to be taken in the same year as ENG 130, in either order. 

MGT 102K INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course focuses on developing an understanding of individual characteristics and interpersonal and organizational processes and how they influence organizational outcomes such as performance, creativity, citizenship behavior, stress, deviance and ethical behavior. Students will have an opportunity to develop their managerial/leadership style through experiential learning. Topics include: personality theory, learning, motivation, power and justice, conflict/negotiation skills, decision making, leadership and team dynamics, communication, and organizational culture. Prerequisite: MGT 100.

MGT 305K STRATEGIC LEADERSHIP
Leadership is the process of transforming organizations from what they are to what the leader would have them become. This course builds upon the basic knowledge of leadership theory and practice provided in introduction to management and organizational behavior courses, and can help prepare the student for a capstone course in business strategy by: 1) expanding the scope and depth of the student’s knowledge of leadership theories in the context of creating strategy in a globalized world, 2) building the student’s capacity to apply leadership theory to situations arising from the economic, social, political and environmental conditions that are transforming our world, and 3) developing the student’s self-knowledge of his or her actual as well as desired leadership style. Prerequisites: MGT 100.

MGT 342K SPORT MANAGEMENT
Sport has become a multibillion-dollar industry, and as such, requires increasingly sophisticated and innovative management. This course introduces students to the business of sport. Students will learn the concepts, principles, and practices of managing sport organizations and sporting events as well as gaining an overview of the sport industry. This course builds on the skills and knowledge from an introductory management and organization course as students learn to apply organizational, management, and leadership principles to sport organizations. Students will also study change and innovation in both sport organizations as well as the sport industry. Prerequisite: MGT 100.

MKT 101K PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING
This introductory course assesses the impact of environmental forces on the practice of marketing. Students will learn the fundamentals of the marketing mix. The course covers the following: target market identification, market research, consumer behavior, product positioning, distribution, communications (personal selling, advertising, sales promotion, and public relations), and pricing decisions. Ideally, should not be taken in same semester as MGT 100.

MKT 326K  DIGITAL MARKETING STRATEGIES 
This course is designed to teach students how to integrate the Internet into marketing and business communication functions. The objective of this course is to increase students’ understanding of the complexity of marketing goods and services on the Internet. This will be accomplished through an analysis of the technology from a marketing/communication perspective. Students will study the concepts and business models of electronic commerce as these relate to the development and implementation of successful Internet strategies. Prerequisite: MKT 101.

MKT 329K DIGITAL ANALYTICS FOR MARKETING
This course is designed to teach students how to measure digital activity and implement best practices for using data to inform marketing strategy decisions. Students will work with web analytics, social media analytics, marketing analytics, and dashboards, helping students to make sense of business measurement challenges, extract marketing tactics, and take effective actions. Prerequisite: MKT 326.

PSY 101K  GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY
In this introduction to psychology students learn the language, methods, theoretical perspectives, and research of the discipline. This course introduces students to a range of topics within psychology, such as the biological and social bases of behavior, as well as basic principles of perception, learning, and motivation. This course counts as a social science in the Core Curriculum requirements. 

PSY 224K STATISTICS 
This course is an introduction to statistical methods used in behavioral research. The course will cover both inferential and descriptive statistics, with an emphasis on the conceptual understanding of how to use statistics to summarize and evaluate information. This course counts as a second Math course in the Core curriculum.

PSY 283K INTRODUCTION TO AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDER
This course provides an introduction to autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Topics will include the history of autism; current diagnostic criteria; genetic, neurological, and environmental causes; assessment; interventions; and lifespan issues. Students will learn the criteria for determining whether an intervention is evidence-based versus pseudoscientific and will examine a range of interventions for ASD to determine whether they can be considered evidence-based. Finally, current controversies in autism will be explored. 

THE 202K MORAL THEOLOGY 
No one can live a genuinely human life without asking the question “How should I live and what kind of life will make me happy?” This course introduces students to the unique way in which theology goes about answering the question of human flourishing. Moral theology is not so much preoccupied with drafting ethical and legal codes, but rather with shedding light on those actions that respond to the deepest aspirations of the human heart. Beginning with the premise that human beings need to be related to God if they are to be truly happy, this class invites students to think about what it would mean to live a morally serious human life. Prerequisite: THE 100 and one THE150s course.

HRS 305K CLIENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS
This course is intended to provide the student anticipating a professional role in the human and rehabilitation services with an opportunity to develop awareness, understanding, and skills related to the use of assessments and evaluation tools. Clients utilizing human and rehabilitation services are in need of professionals with skills in utilizing assessment results in order to plan and provide appropriate interventions. This course will utilize a lifespan approach to provide an overview of common assessment and evaluation tools used in a variety of human service and applied settings such as schools, early intervention programs, and rehabilitation agencies

HRS 330K INTERVIEWING TECHNIQUES IN HUMAN AND REHABILITATION SERVICES
This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the interview process. A strong emphasis will be placed on developing skills in applying and utilizing specific interviewing skills and techniques in human and rehabilitation service settings. Students will understand the impact of diversity, culture, and individual lifestyles on the helping process. The course will assist students to apply effective interpersonal skills in interviewing and communicating with persons with disabilities, their families, related professionals, and the general public. Client choice and consumer self-direction will be emphasized in interviewing and counseling situations. Students will be taught to incorporate cultural sensitivity into daily practice and interactions with clients. Ethical principles and decision making will be discussed and practiced. Prerequisites: HRS 119.
 
MAT 114K ELEMENTARY FUNCTIONS
A survey of those topics in algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry which provide the background for the study of calculus. Topics to be covered include exponential and logarithmic functions, complex numbers and polynomial functions, trigonometry, plane analytic geometry, and systems of linear equations and inequalities. Not open to those who have completed MAT 117 or 131. Prerequisite: MAT 111 or departmental permission through placement. Counts in the Core Curriculum Requirements as Mathematics Group A. If only one Mathematics course is taken to fulfill the Core requirement in Mathematics, it must be at this level or higher
 

Summer Session II Course Descriptions

ACC 126K PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II
A consideration of some of the more complex areas of financial accounting and an introduction to managerial accounting and its role in the planning and control of business operations. Changes in financial position, analysis of financial statements, cost accounting, and budgeting will be examined. The impact of accounting information on internal decision-making will be emphasized. Prerequisite: ACC 125.

BIO 110K NUTRITION 
This course will explore the basic principles of human nutrition. Topics to be covered include nutrient classes, nutritional guidelines, nutrition-related diseases and disparities in access to healthy foods. This course will also cover controversial topics in nutrition such as GMOs and fad dieting. This will be an interactive course that will require students to use the scientific method and will include in-class research, data collection, presentations and discussions. Two or three integrated lecture-laboratory sessions per week. Lab fee: $200. This course fulfills the science core curriculum requirement.

CSC 117K INTRODUCTION TO PROGRAMMING
This course is an introduction to the field of computer science and structured programming in C++. Topics include basic computer architecture, the algorithmic approach to problem solving, various number systems, and logic. The programming language constructs introduced include types of variables, arithmetic operations, input/output, decision statements, loops, and functions.

ECO 110K PRINCIPLES OF MICROECONOMICS 
An examination of the basic theory and performance of the household, business, and government in determining the nature of the output of the economy and its distribution among the members of the society. Policy issues considered may include public control of business, labor unions, agriculture, the environment, income distribution and poverty, and international trade. ECO 110 may be taken to satisfy the Core requirement for either a second scientific or quantitative option or a social science. Prerequisite: MAT 111.

LTE 140K INTRODUCTION TO LITERATURE 
This course is designed to acquaint the students with the form and structure of various genres of literature. Readings are mainly drawn from English and American literature. Class discussion and writing assignments will make use of such critical concepts as point of view, imagery, and tone. Counts in the Core Curriculum as a Core Seminar, to be taken in the same year as ENG 130, in either order.

MGT 100K INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT
This course introduces a systems approach to managing organizations and focuses on the planning, organizing, leading, and controlling tasks and functions of managers. Students are given the opportunity to development key managerial skills such as self-management, team management and organizational management that support effective performance. The course includes an introduction to basic Microsoft Excel, Word, and presentation software for business communication. Ideally, MGT 100 should not be taken in same semester as MKT 101.

MKT 316K PUBLIC RELATIONS
This is a practitioner-level course which melds business goals and the writing process to deliver a set of skills which bridges the information gap between organizations and their publics. Topics include: Basics of Style, Media Relations, Press Releases, Brochures, Newsletters, Magazines, Annual Reports, Media Copy Writing, Speech Writing, and the use of Web Pages. Prerequisite: MKT 101.

MKT 327 SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING
This course will cover one of the fastest growth areas within the marketing discipline—social media marketing. Over the last half dozen years, organizations have shifted more of their marketing expenditures from traditional to digital marketing campaigns. Within digital marketing, expenditures for campaigns that involve social media tactics have grown exponentially. Although specific social media platforms or channels such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter may come and go, the underlying principles behind social media, of engaging present and potential customers with content that they want to share with others, are here to stay. Prerequisite: MKT 101.

MKT 344K SPORTS MARKETING
Students electing this course explore the various segments of the sports business in the United States and around the world. The course utilizes the basic elements of strategic marketing (consumer, product, price, place, and promotion) and relates them to the business of sports. Topics include the consumer as a sports participant and spectator, the fan cost index, sponsorships, endorsements, event marketing, sports advertisements, sports media, sporting goods, lifestyle marketing, and more. Prerequisite: MKT101.

MUS 126K GLOBAL POP 
A category of ethnomusicology, Global Pop explores musical traditions from a variety of nations with an emphasis on the popular music industry in each. This course examines the forces that enable the movement of music and musicians around the world and that give global music its persuasive power. Topics include music as expressive culture, music production, ethnicity and identity in pop music, music as symbol, cross-cultural collaborations in popular music, and music as a force that transcends sociological, political and national boundaries. This course fulfills the Core requirement for a Fine Art class in Culture and Expression, and also counts in the Core as a Global Awareness course. 

PSY 216K ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY
This course provides students with a detailed description and analysis of the forms of behavior seen as abnormal in our contemporary culture. Research relevant to and theoretical perspectives on these disorders are presented. Throughout the course students are asked to consider the implications of being labeled abnormal and to apply their knowledge to individual cases.

SPA 102K SPANISH II
This course is the second part of the beginning sequence offering students the opportunity to expand their knowledge of vocabulary and grammatical structures. The course provides an integrated approach in which listening, speaking, reading and writing are developed. The course fosters awareness of Hispanic cultures through short readings and a variety of oral and written activities. Prerequisites: SPA 101, or one or two years of high school Spanish.

SPA 201K SPANISH III
Continued development of communicative competency in Spanish language and Hispanic culture including a variety of media. Prerequisite: SPA 102, or two or three years of high school Spanish, or equivalent. Media fee $15.

THE 100K INTRODUCTION TO THEOLOGY 
This course introduces students to the intellectual challenge posed by the academic study of Catholic theology. Through the study of selected classic and contemporary texts, the course familiarizes students with the nature, foundations, history, methods, and ends of Catholic theology. Students will become familiar with some of the distinctive movements and thinkers of the Catholic theological tradition, as well as the dialogue between Catholicism and other theological traditions. Each section of this course examines a book from the Old and a book from the New Testament, St. Augustine’s Confessions, the thought of a medieval and the thought of a modern Catholic theologian, and the thought of a non-Catholic theologian. 

THE 150K THE PROBLEM OF GOD 
This course uses a variety of theological, philosophical, and literary works, including Augustine’s The City of God, to examine what the twentieth-century American theologian John Courtney Murray called “the problem of God.” That problem focuses on the challenge that the idea of God, in general, and the Christian understanding of God, in particular, poses to the human mind. This course fulfills the second theology requirement in the core curriculum program

MAT 117K CALCULUS I
An introductory course in differential calculus. Topics to be covered include limits and continuity, the derivative and applications, and an introduction to integration. Not open to those who complete MAT 131. Prerequisite: MAT 114 or department permission through placement. 

PHI 151K ETHICS AND THE GOOD LIFE
Each person must confront the question, How should I live? In doing so, one may also wonder, Do the ends justify the means? Are intentions all that count? Is God the source of right and wrong? How important are my desires? Many things seem good that later prove to be evil or merely incomplete goods for the human being. This course uses classic texts to investigate common opinions about the human good in light of our need to distinguish apparent goods from true goods. Ultimately, what is it to live well? Texts include Aristotle’s Ethics and readings from the utilitarian and the Kantian traditions. Prerequisite: PHI 100.