The Untold Truth Of Twin Peaks Restaurants

The Untold Truth Of Twin Peaks Restaurants

If you've visited a Hooters at any point in your life, you're probably already pretty familiar with the overall Twin Peaks concept: Young, scantily-clad servers and hostesses, serving gigantic pitchers of beer and assorted bar food and feigning interest in the mostly male clientele, for a few hours of G-rated, family-friendly titillation. Hooters may have pioneered the concept, but competing chains like Twin Peaks have pushed the concept of "attentive service" restaurants (or, as they're more casually known, "breastraunts") so far that they almost make the orange-short-and-tank-top wearing Hooters girls seem downright wholesome by comparison.

Based in Dallas, Texas, each of Twin Peaks' more than 80 locations is themed to look like a fantasy version of a rustic mountain wilderness lodge, complete with large fireplaces, faux stonework, stuffed and mounted animal trophies, and dozens of gigantic television screens, with staff outfitted in midriff-and-cleavage-revealing cropped plaid shirts and khaki-colored shorts. But the standard-issue Twin Peaks uniform is tame compared to the outfits servers wear during so-called "theme weeks," which include swimsuits, lingerie, and revealing costumes.

It may seem ridiculous, but the strategy has translated into success. In 2014, Twin Peaks was the fastest-growing restaurant chain in the United States, with same-store sales outpacing trends in the overall dining industry and making it one of the strongest performers in the casual dining sector. But behind those cheerful smiles and platters full of boneless buffalo wings lies something of a dark side. Let's take a look at the untold truth of Twin Peaks.