Tin-zinc

Grimy nickel.png

This article or section needs to be

cleaned up

to reach a higher standard of article quality.

Please follow the guidelines of our manual of style and complete this article to a higher level of quality. When this is done, this message may be removed.

Tin-zinc

Tin-zinc yen.jpg

Tin-zinc

yen

coins

General information

Material type

metal alloy

Color

silver

Magnetic

?

no

Composition

70-90% tin, 10-30% zinc[1]

Numismatic information

Used for

circulation coins

Used by

Merchant flag of Japan (1870).svg Empire of Japan[2]

v ·

d

· e

Tin-zinc is an alloy typically composed of 70-90% tin and 10-30% zinc.[1] It is one of several metallic alloys used for coins.

Description

[

]

Tin-zinc was first introduced in the 1940s. It is very similar to aluminum in appearance and in mass. The alloy is resistant towards corrosion, and sulfur-enhanced, salty, and acidic environments.[1]

Numismatics

[

]

Tin-zinc is not a common alloy used in coin production. Four Imperial Japanese yen coins, the 1944-45 1 sen, 1944 5 sen, 1945-46 5 sen, and 1944 10 sen coins were struck in tin-zinc during World War II, and are the only coins mentioned as being composed "tin-zinc" in the Standard Catalog of World Coins.[2]

See also

[

]

  • Copper-tin-zinc

References

[

]

v · d · e

Normal metals

Aluminum ·

Antimony

· Carbon ·

Chromium

·

Cobalt

·

Copper

· Gold ·

Hafnium

·

Iron

·

Lead

·

Magnesium

·

Manganese

·

Molybdenum

·

Nickel

· Niobium · Palladium ·

Platinum

·

Rhenium

· Rhodium ·

Ruthenium

·

Selenium

·

Silver

·

Tantalum

·

Tellurium

·

Tin

·

Titanium

· Tungsten ·

Vanadium

·

Zinc

·

Zirconium

Alloys

Acmonital

·

Aluminum-bronze

·

Argentan

·

Barton's metal

·

Bath metal

·

Bell metal

·

Billon

·

Brass

·

Bronze

·

Copper-nickel-zinc

·

Crown gold

· Cupronickel ·

Dowmetal

·

Electrum

·

Franklinium

·

German silver

·

Gun metal

·

Manganese-bronze

·

Nickel-brass

·

Nickel-silver

· Nordic gold ·

Orichalchum

·

Pewter

·

Pinchbeck

·

Potin

·

Silver alloys

· Speculum ·

Stainless steel

·

Steel

· Tin-zinc ·

Tombac

·

Virenium

· White metal

Other materials

Coal · Porcelain ·

Wood