What Are the Courses on the British Open Rotation?

The British Open is the oldest championship in golf, and this major rotates venues each year. Fourteen courses have hosted the British Open since the beginning in 1860, and today, nine courses make up the rota. These are the English, Scottish, and Northern Irish courses on the Open rota, and some of the rich history surrounding them.

Current British Open Rota Courses

These are the nine courses that currently make up the British Open rota, many of which you can play if you're looking for a bucket-list golf experience.

Old Course at St. Andrews

Located in the spiritual home of golf, St. Andrews, Scotland, the Old Course at St. Andrews has hosted the British Open 29 times, more than any other venue. St. Andrews is set to host the 150th British Open in 2022.

Muirfield

Muirfield, in Gullane, Scotland, first hosted the British Open in 1892. Muirfield is another historic Scottish course that remains in rotation for hosting duties. Muirfield has hosted 16 British Opens, mostly in 2013.

Muirfield in Scotland

Royal St George's Golf Club

Located in Sandwich, England, Royal St George's Golf Club became the first course outside of Scotland to host the British Open. Royal St George's hosted in 2021 and has been the host course 15 times.

Royal St. George's

Royal Liverpool Golf Club

Located just outside Liverpool in Hoylake, England, Royal Liverpool Golf Club maintains its status as one of England's best courses. Royal Liverpool is slated to host the 2023 British Open which will be its 13th Open.

Royal Liverpool

Royal Troon Golf Club

Located southwest of Glasgow, the Royal Troon Golf Club has hosted nine British Opens. Royal Troon will host the British Open in 2024, its first since 2016 when Henrik Stenson won.

Royal Troon

Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club

One of the world's greatest links courses, Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club has hosted 11 British Opens. It is located in Lytham St Annes, England. The course last hosted the British Open in 2012, but there is no future date yet planned for a return.

Royal Lytham & St. Anne's

Carnoustie Golf Links

Located in Carnoustie, Scotland, Carnoustie first hosted the British Open in 1931. Carnoustie has hosted the British Open eight times, most recently in 2018 when Francesco Molinari claimed the Claret Jug. Carnoustie's 18th hole is also the home of one of golf's most infamous meltdowns of all time, as Jean Van de Velde let the Brish Open slip through his hands with an unsightly 72nd hole double-bogey.

Carnoustie Golf Links

Royal Portrush Golf Club

The only course located outside of Scotland and England to host the British Open, Northern Ireland's Royal Portrush Golf Club has hosted two British Open championships, most recently in 2019. Royal Portrush is also on schedule to host in 2025.

Royal Portrush

Royal Birkdale Golf Club

Frequently making global "best of" lists, Southport, England's Royal Birkdale Golf Club first hosted the Open in 1954 and last hosted the 2017 British Open when Jordan Spieth won. Royal Birkdale has hosted 10 times with no future tournament scheduled.

Royal Birkdale

Former Courses

In addition to the nine courses listed above, an additional five courses have held the honor of hosting a British Open.

Prestwick Golf Club

Prestwick is the original Britsh Open course, hosting the inaugural event in 1860. In total, Prestwick held 24 tournaments with the last one in 1925.

Musselburgh Links

Musselburgh is recognized as one of the oldest courses in the world, with rounds dating back to 1672. The course hosted six British Opens with the last in 1889.

Royal Cinque Ports Golf Club

Located in England, Royal Cinque Ports only held two British Open championships, 1909 and 1920.

Prince's Golf Club

Not to be outdone, Prince's Golf Club (also in England) only held one British Open in 1932, which was won by Gene Sarazen.

Turnberry

South Ayrshire, Scotland's Turnberry is the most recent cut from the British Open rotation. Turnberry was the host course four times from 1977-2009, with the 2009 event won by Stewart Cink.