What Is the Difference between Electronic and Electrical Devices? – dummies

{"appState":{"pageLoadApiCallsStatus":true},"articleState":{"article":{"headers":{"creationTime":"2016-03-26T18:45:19+00:00","modifiedTime":"2016-03-26T18:45:19+00:00","timestamp":"2022-06-22T19:26:21+00:00"},"data":{"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/33512"},"slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/33543"},"slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"General Electronics","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/33571"},"slug":"general-electronics","categoryId":33571}],"title":"What Is the Difference between Electronic and Electrical Devices?","strippedTitle":"what is the difference between electronic and electrical devices?","slug":"what-is-the-difference-between-electronic-and-electrical-devices","canonicalUrl":"","seo":{"metaDescription":"When the field of electronics was invented in 1883, electrical devices had already been around for at least 100 years. For example: The first electric batteries","noIndex":0,"noFollow":0},"content":"<p>When the field of electronics was invented in 1883, electrical devices had already been around for at least 100 years. For example:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">The first electric batteries were invented by a fellow named Alessandro Volta in 1800. Volta’s contribution is so important that the common <i>volt </i>is named for him. (There is some archeological evidence that the ancient Parthian Empire may have invented the electric battery in the second century BC, but if so we don’t know what they used their batteries for, and their invention was forgotten for 2,000 years.)</p>\n </li>\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">The electric telegraph was invented in the 1830s and popularized in America by Samuel Morse, who invented the famous Morse code used to encode the alphabet and numerals into a series of short and long clicks that could be transmitted via telegraph. In 1866, a telegraph cable was laid across the Atlantic Ocean allowing instantaneous communication between the United States and Europe.</p>\n </li>\n</ul>\n<p>All of these devices, and many other common devices still in use today, such as light bulbs, vacuum cleaners, and toasters, are known as <i>electrical devices</i>. So what exactly is the difference between electrical devices and <i>electronic devices</i>?</p>\n<p>The answer lies in how devices manipulate electricity to do their work. Electrical devices take the energy of electric current and transform it in simple ways into some other form of energy — most likely light, heat, or motion. The heating elements in a toaster turn electrical energy into heat so you can burn your toast. And the motor in your vacuum cleaner turns electrical energy into motion that drives a pump that sucks the burnt toast crumbs out of your carpet.</p>\n<p>In contrast, electronic devices do much more. Instead of just converting electrical energy into heat, light, or motion, electronic devices are designed to manipulate the electrical current itself to coax it into doing interesting and useful things.</p>\n<p>That very first electronic device invented in 1883 by Thomas Edison manipulated the electric current passing through a light bulb in a way that let Edison create a device that could monitor the voltage being provided to an electrical circuit and automatically increase or decrease the voltage if it became too low or too high.</p>\n<p>One of the most common things that electronic devices do is manipulate electric current in a way that adds meaningful information to the current. For example, audio electronic devices add sound information to an electric current so that you can listen to music or talk on a cellphone. And video devices add images to an electric current so you can watch great movies until you know every line by heart.</p>\n<p>Keep in mind that the distinction between electric and electronic devices is a bit blurry. What used to be simple electrical devices now often include some electronic components in them. For example, your toaster may contain an electronic thermostat that attempts to keep the heat at just the right temperature to make perfect toast.</p>\n<p>And even the most complicated electronic devices have simple electrical components in them. For example, although your TV set's remote control is a pretty complicated little electronic device, it contains batteries, which are simple electrical devices.</p>","description":"<p>When the field of electronics was invented in 1883, electrical devices had already been around for at least 100 years. For example:</p>\n<ul class=\"level-one\">\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">The first electric batteries were invented by a fellow named Alessandro Volta in 1800. Volta’s contribution is so important that the common <i>volt </i>is named for him. (There is some archeological evidence that the ancient Parthian Empire may have invented the electric battery in the second century BC, but if so we don’t know what they used their batteries for, and their invention was forgotten for 2,000 years.)</p>\n </li>\n <li><p class=\"first-para\">The electric telegraph was invented in the 1830s and popularized in America by Samuel Morse, who invented the famous Morse code used to encode the alphabet and numerals into a series of short and long clicks that could be transmitted via telegraph. In 1866, a telegraph cable was laid across the Atlantic Ocean allowing instantaneous communication between the United States and Europe.</p>\n </li>\n</ul>\n<p>All of these devices, and many other common devices still in use today, such as light bulbs, vacuum cleaners, and toasters, are known as <i>electrical devices</i>. So what exactly is the difference between electrical devices and <i>electronic devices</i>?</p>\n<p>The answer lies in how devices manipulate electricity to do their work. Electrical devices take the energy of electric current and transform it in simple ways into some other form of energy — most likely light, heat, or motion. The heating elements in a toaster turn electrical energy into heat so you can burn your toast. And the motor in your vacuum cleaner turns electrical energy into motion that drives a pump that sucks the burnt toast crumbs out of your carpet.</p>\n<p>In contrast, electronic devices do much more. Instead of just converting electrical energy into heat, light, or motion, electronic devices are designed to manipulate the electrical current itself to coax it into doing interesting and useful things.</p>\n<p>That very first electronic device invented in 1883 by Thomas Edison manipulated the electric current passing through a light bulb in a way that let Edison create a device that could monitor the voltage being provided to an electrical circuit and automatically increase or decrease the voltage if it became too low or too high.</p>\n<p>One of the most common things that electronic devices do is manipulate electric current in a way that adds meaningful information to the current. For example, audio electronic devices add sound information to an electric current so that you can listen to music or talk on a cellphone. And video devices add images to an electric current so you can watch great movies until you know every line by heart.</p>\n<p>Keep in mind that the distinction between electric and electronic devices is a bit blurry. What used to be simple electrical devices now often include some electronic components in them. For example, your toaster may contain an electronic thermostat that attempts to keep the heat at just the right temperature to make perfect toast.</p>\n<p>And even the most complicated electronic devices have simple electrical components in them. For example, although your TV set's remote control is a pretty complicated little electronic device, it contains batteries, which are simple electrical devices.</p>","blurb":"","authors":[{"authorId":8946,"name":"Doug Lowe","slug":"doug-lowe","description":" <p><b>Doug Lowe </b>is the information technology director at Blair, Church & Flynn Consulting Engineers, a civil engineering firm. He has written more than 50 <i>For Dummies</i> books on topics ranging from Java to electronics to PowerPoint.</p> ","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/authors/8946"}}],"primaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":33571,"title":"General Electronics","slug":"general-electronics","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/categories/33571"}},"secondaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"tertiaryCategoryTaxonomy":{"categoryId":0,"title":null,"slug":null,"_links":null},"trendingArticles":null,"inThisArticle":[],"relatedArticles":{"fromBook":[],"fromCategory":[{"articleId":239510,"title":"How to Assemble a Color Organ Circuit","slug":"assemble-color-organ-circuit","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/239510"}},{"articleId":239507,"title":"What You Need to Build a Color Organ Circuit","slug":"need-build-color-organ-circuit","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/239507"}},{"articleId":239504,"title":"How a Color Organ Works","slug":"color-organ-works","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/239504"}},{"articleId":239501,"title":"What is a Color Organ Circuit?","slug":"color-organ-circuit","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/239501"}},{"articleId":239497,"title":"How to Use a Color Organ Circuit","slug":"use-color-organ-circuit","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/articles/239497"}}]},"hasRelatedBookFromSearch":true,"relatedBook":{"bookId":281694,"slug":"electronics-all-in-one-for-dummies","isbn":"9781119822110","categoryList":["technology","electronics","general-electronics"],"amazon":{"default":"https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1119822114/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","ca":"https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/1119822114/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","indigo_ca":"http://www.tkqlhce.com/click-9208661-13710633?url=https://www.chapters.indigo.ca/en-ca/books/product/1119822114-item.html&cjsku=978111945484","gb":"https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/1119822114/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20","de":"https://www.amazon.de/gp/product/1119822114/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=wiley01-20"},"image":{"src":"https://catalogimages.wiley.com/images/db/jimages/9781119822110.jpg","width":250,"height":350},"title":"Electronics All-in-One For Dummies","testBankPinActivationLink":"","bookOutOfPrint":true,"authorsInfo":"\n <p><p><b><b data-author-id=\"8946\">Doug Lowe</b></b> is a master at demystifying technology. The 50&#43; technology books he&#39;s written include more than 30 <i>For Dummies</i> books, including <i>Networking All&#45;in&#45;One For Dummies.</i> Doug has been managing networks at publishing companies and nonprofit organizations for more than 20 years and is presently IT director for a civil engineering firm.</b></p>","authors":[{"authorId":8946,"name":"Doug Lowe","slug":"doug-lowe","description":" <p><b>Doug Lowe</b> is a master at demystifying technology. The 50&#43; technology books he&#39;s written include more than 30 <i>For Dummies</i> books, including <i>Networking All&#45;in&#45;One For Dummies.</i> Doug has been managing networks at publishing companies and nonprofit organizations for more than 20 years and is presently IT director for a civil engineering firm.</b>\t ","_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/authors/8946"}}],"_links":{"self":"https://dummies-api.dummies.com/v2/books/281694"}},"collections":[],"articleAds":{"footerAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\"><div class=\"du-ad-unit col-md-12\" data-slot-id=\"article_page_adhesion_ad\" data-refreshed=\"false\" \r\n data-target = \"[{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;cat&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[&quot;technology&quot;,&quot;electronics&quot;,&quot;general-electronics&quot;]},{&quot;key&quot;:&quot;isbn&quot;,&quot;values&quot;:[null]}]\" id=\"du-slot-62b36cdd30b0b\"></div></div>","rightAd":"<div class=\"du-ad-region row\" 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Category","mainCategoryUrl":"/category/articles/level-0-category-0"}}},"navigationCategoriesLoadedStatus":"success"},"searchState":{"searchList":[],"searchStatus":"initial","relatedArticlesList":{"term":"180217","count":5,"total":372,"topCategory":0,"items":[{"objectType":"article","id":180217,"data":{"title":"What Is the Difference between Electronic and Electrical Devices?","slug":"what-is-the-difference-between-electronic-and-electrical-devices","update_time":"2016-03-26T18:45:19+00:00","object_type":"article","image":null,"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"General Electronics","slug":"general-electronics","categoryId":33571}],"description":"When the field of electronics was invented in 1883, electrical devices had already been around for at least 100 years. For example:\n\n The first electric batteries were invented by a fellow named Alessandro Volta in 1800. Volta’s contribution is so important that the common volt is named for him. (There is some archeological evidence that the ancient Parthian Empire may have invented the electric battery in the second century BC, but if so we don’t know what they used their batteries for, and their invention was forgotten for 2,000 years.)\n \n The electric telegraph was invented in the 1830s and popularized in America by Samuel Morse, who invented the famous Morse code used to encode the alphabet and numerals into a series of short and long clicks that could be transmitted via telegraph. In 1866, a telegraph cable was laid across the Atlantic Ocean allowing instantaneous communication between the United States and Europe.\n \n\nAll of these devices, and many other common devices still in use today, such as light bulbs, vacuum cleaners, and toasters, are known as electrical devices. So what exactly is the difference between electrical devices and electronic devices?\nThe answer lies in how devices manipulate electricity to do their work. Electrical devices take the energy of electric current and transform it in simple ways into some other form of energy — most likely light, heat, or motion. The heating elements in a toaster turn electrical energy into heat so you can burn your toast. And the motor in your vacuum cleaner turns electrical energy into motion that drives a pump that sucks the burnt toast crumbs out of your carpet.\nIn contrast, electronic devices do much more. Instead of just converting electrical energy into heat, light, or motion, electronic devices are designed to manipulate the electrical current itself to coax it into doing interesting and useful things.\nThat very first electronic device invented in 1883 by Thomas Edison manipulated the electric current passing through a light bulb in a way that let Edison create a device that could monitor the voltage being provided to an electrical circuit and automatically increase or decrease the voltage if it became too low or too high.\nOne of the most common things that electronic devices do is manipulate electric current in a way that adds meaningful information to the current. For example, audio electronic devices add sound information to an electric current so that you can listen to music or talk on a cellphone. And video devices add images to an electric current so you can watch great movies until you know every line by heart.\nKeep in mind that the distinction between electric and electronic devices is a bit blurry. What used to be simple electrical devices now often include some electronic components in them. For example, your toaster may contain an electronic thermostat that attempts to keep the heat at just the right temperature to make perfect toast.\nAnd even the most complicated electronic devices have simple electrical components in them. For example, although your TV set's remote control is a pretty complicated little electronic device, it contains batteries, which are simple electrical devices.","item_vector":null},"titleHighlight":null,"descriptionHighlights":null,"headers":null},{"objectType":"article","id":180191,"data":{"title":"<b>What Is an Electronic Circuit?</b>","slug":"what-is-an-electronic-circuit","update_time":"2016-03-26T18:45:03+00:00","object_type":"article","image":null,"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"Circuitry","slug":"circuitry","categoryId":33549}],"description":"An electronic circuit is a complete course of conductors through which current can travel. Circuits provide a path for current to flow. To be a circuit, this path must start and end at the same point. In other words, a circuit must form a loop. An electronic circuit and an electrical circuit has the same definition, but electronic circuits tend to be low voltage circuits.\nFor example, a simple circuit may include two components: a battery and a lamp. The circuit allows current to flow from the battery to the lamp, through the lamp, then back to the battery. Thus, the circuit forms a complete loop.\n\nOf course, circuits can be more complex. However, all circuits can be distilled down to three basic elements:\n\n Voltage source: A voltage source causes current to flow like a battery, for instance.\n \n Load: The load consumes power; it represents the actual work done by the circuit. Without the load, there's not much point in having a circuit.\nThe load can be as simple as a single light bulb. In complex circuits, the load is a combination of components, such as resistors, capacitors, transistors, and so on.\n \n Conductive path: The conductive path provides a route through which current flows. This route begins at the voltage source, travels through the load, and then returns to the voltage source. This path must form a loop from the negative side of the voltage source to the positive side of the voltage source.\n \n\nThe following paragraphs describe a few additional interesting points to keep in mind as you ponder the nature of basic circuits:\n\n When a circuit is complete and forms a loop that allows current to flow, the circuit is called a closed circuit. If any part of the circuit is disconnected or disrupted so that a loop is not formed, current cannot flow. In that case, the circuit is called an open circuit.\nOpen circuit is an oxymoron. After all, the components must form a complete path to be considered a circuit. If the path is open, it isn't a circuit. Therefore, open circuit is most often used to describe a circuit that has become broken, either on purpose (by the use of a switch) or by some error, such as a loose connection or a damaged component.\n \n Short circuit refers to a circuit that does not have a load. For example, if the lamp is connected to the circuit but a direct connection is present between the battery's negative terminal and its positive terminal, too.\n\nCurrent in a short circuit can flow at dangerously high levels. Short circuits can damage electronic components, cause a battery to explode, or maybe start a fire.\nThe short circuit illustrates an important point about electrical circuits: it is possible — common, even — for a circuit to have multiple pathways for current to flow. The current can flow through the lamp as well as through the path that connects the two battery terminals directly.\nCurrent flows everywhere it can. If your circuit has two pathways through which current can flow, the current doesn't choose one over the other; it chooses both. However, not all paths are equal, so current doesn't flow equally through all paths.\nFor example, current will flow much more easily through the short circuit than it will through the lamp. Thus, the lamp will not glow because nearly all of the current will bypass the lamp in favor of the easier route through the short circuit. Even so, a small amount of current will flow through the lamp.\n \n","item_vector":null},"titleHighlight":null,"descriptionHighlights":null,"headers":null},{"objectType":"article","id":180363,"data":{"title":"What Can You Do with Electronics?","slug":"what-can-you-do-with-electronics","update_time":"2016-03-26T18:47:15+00:00","object_type":"article","image":null,"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"General Electronics","slug":"general-electronics","categoryId":33571}],"description":"The amazing thing about electronics is that it's being used today to do things that weren't even imaginable just a few years ago. Here’s very brief overview of some of the basic things you can do with electronics.\nMake noise with electronics\nOne of the most common applications for electronics is making noise. Often in the form of music, though the distinction between noise and music is often debatable. Electronic devices that make noise are often referred to as audio devices. These devices convert sound waves to electrical current, and then store, amplify, and otherwise manipulate the current, and eventually convert the current back to sound waves you can hear.\nMost audio devices have these three parts:\n\n A source, which is the input into the system. The source can be a microphone, which is a device that converts sound waves into an electrical signal. The subtle fluctuations in the sound waves are translated into subtle fluctuations in the electrical signal. Thus, the electrical signal that comes from the source contains audio information.\nThe source may also be a recorded form of the sound, such as sound recorded on a CD or in an MP3.\n \n An amplifier, which converts the small electrical signal that comes from the source into a much larger electrical signal that, when sent to the speaker or headphones, can be heard.\nSome amplifiers are small, as they need to boost the signal only enough to be heard by a single listener wearing headphones. Other amplifiers are huge, as they need to boost the signal enough so that 80,000 people can hear, for example, a famous singer forget the words to The Star Spangled Banner.\n \n Speakers, which convert electrical current into sound you can hear. Speakers may be huge, or they may be small enough to fit in your ear.\n \n\nElectronics light up our lives\nAnother common use of electronics is to produce light. The simplest electronic light circuits are light-emitting diodes (LEDs), which are the electronic equivalent of a light bulb.\nVideo electronic devices are designed to create not just simple points of light, but complete images that you can look at. The most obvious examples are television sets, which can provide hours and hours of entertainment and ask for so little in return — just a few of your brain cells.\nSome types of electronic devices work with light that you can't see. The most common are TV remote controls, which send infrared light to your television set whenever you push a button. The electronics inside the remote control manipulate the infrared light in a way that sends information from the remote control to the TV, telling it to turn up the volume, change channels, or turn off the power.\nRadio electronics transmit sound\nRadio refers to the transmission of information without wires. Originally, radio was used as a wireless form of telegraph, broadcasting nothing more than audible clicks. Next, radio was used to transmit sound.\nIn fact, to this day the term radio is usually associated with audio-only transmissions, either in the form of music or the ever-popular talk radio. However, the transmission of video information — in other words, television — is also a form of radio, as are wireless networking, cordless phones, and cellphones.\nDigital electronics calculate and compute\nOne of the most important applications of electronics in the last 50 years has been the development of computer technology. In just a few short decades, computers have gone from simple calculating machines to machines that can beat humans at Jeopardy!\nComputers are the most advanced form of a whole field of electronics known as digital electronics, which is concerned with manipulating data in the binary language of zeros and ones.","item_vector":null},"titleHighlight":null,"descriptionHighlights":null,"headers":null},{"objectType":"article","id":141422,"data":{"title":"What Is Electronics?","slug":"what-is-electronics","update_time":"2016-03-26T07:29:47+00:00","object_type":"article","image":null,"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"General Electronics","slug":"general-electronics","categoryId":33571}],"description":"Electrical systems use electric current to power things such as light bulbs and kitchen appliances. Electronic systems take this a step further. When you turn on a light in your home, you’re connecting a source of electrical energy (usually supplied by your power company) to a light bulb in a complete path, known as an electrical circuit.\nIf you add a dimmer or a timer to the light bulb circuit, you can control the operation of the light bulb in a more interesting way than just manually switching it on and off. Electronic systems control the current, switching it on and off, changing its fluctuations, direction, and timing in various ways to accomplish a variety of functions, from dimming a light bulb, to flashing your holiday light display in sync with your favorite holiday tune, to communicating via satellites — and lots of other things. This control distinguishes electronic systems from electrical systems.\nThe dimmer electronics in this circuit control the flow of electric current to the light bulb.\nThe word electronics describes both the field of study that focuses on the control of electrical energy and the physical systems (including circuits, components, and interconnections) that implement this control of electrical energy.\nTo understand what it means to control electric current, first you need a good working sense of what electric current really is and how it powers things such as light bulbs, speakers, and motors.","item_vector":null},"titleHighlight":null,"descriptionHighlights":null,"headers":null},{"objectType":"article","id":141292,"data":{"title":"What Do Electronic Circuits Look Like?","slug":"what-do-electronic-circuits-look-like","update_time":"2016-03-26T07:28:44+00:00","object_type":"article","image":null,"breadcrumbs":[{"name":"Technology","slug":"technology","categoryId":33512},{"name":"Electronics","slug":"electronics","categoryId":33543},{"name":"General Electronics","slug":"general-electronics","categoryId":33571}],"description":"Circuits in electronics usually don't look as neat and geometric as you might expect. The shape of a circuit is usually not important for its operation. What matters about any circuit — and what you should concern yourself with when building one — is how the components are connected, because the connections show you the path the current takes through the circuit.\nThe shape of a circuit does matter for circuits involving high-frequency signals, such as radio-frequency (RF) and microwave circuits. The layout, or placement of circuit components, must be designed with care to reduce noise and other undesired AC signals. Additionally, the proximity of bypass capacitors to other circuit components can make a difference in the performance of many circuits.\nThe figure is a photograph of a 1980's style dimmer switch circuit. This simple electronic device uses just a few components to control current flow to a built-in light fixture in a house. But most electronic systems are a lot more complicated than this; they connect lots of individual components in one or more circuits to achieve their ultimate goal.\nA dimmer switch is a simple electronic circuit with just a few components.\nThe next figure gives you an inside view of the circuitry of a computer hard drive. The circuit consists of the following, all attached to a specialized surface known as a printed circuit board, or PCB:\n\n Many discrete components (individual parts, such as resistors and capacitors)\n \n An assortment of integrated circuits, or ICs (which look like electronic centipedes)\n \n Connectors (which, not surprisingly, connect the hard drive electronics to the rest of the computer).\nComputer hard drive electronics.\n \n\nICs are nothing more than a bunch of tiny circuits that work together to perform a function so commonly desired that it's worthwhile to mass-produce the circuit and package it in a protective case with leads (the centipede legs) that enable access to the circuit inside.\nAfter you discover how different types of components control current flow in circuits and can apply voltage and current laws, you can begin to design and construct useful electronic circuits.","item_vector":null},"titleHighlight":null,"descriptionHighlights":null,"headers":null}]},"relatedArticlesStatus":"success"},"routeState":{"name":"Article3","path":"/article/technology/electronics/general-electronics/what-is-the-difference-between-electronic-and-electrical-devices-180217/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{"category1":"technology","category2":"electronics","category3":"general-electronics","article":"what-is-the-difference-between-electronic-and-electrical-devices-180217"},"fullPath":"/article/technology/electronics/general-electronics/what-is-the-difference-between-electronic-and-electrical-devices-180217/","meta":{"routeType":"article","breadcrumbInfo":{"suffix":"Articles","baseRoute":"/category/articles"},"prerenderWithAsyncData":true},"from":{"name":null,"path":"/","hash":"","query":{},"params":{},"fullPath":"/","meta":{}}},"dropsState":{"submitEmailResponse":false,"status":"initial"},"sfmcState":{"status":"initial"},"profileState":{"auth":{},"userOptions":{},"status":"initial"}}