Writing Courses | Boston University Summer Term

    Prereq: (CAS WR 111) if required by placement test. Critical reading and analytical writing in response to various theme-based texts. Review of grammar and mechanics in context. Practice in the patterns of academic argumentation through multiple assignments of increasing complexity. Refinement of speaking skills through discussions and oral presentations. Effective Fall 2018, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Revisiting Fairy Tales. A case study of three fairy tales: “Red Riding Hood,” “Beauty and the Beast,” and "Bluebeard." Students read multiple versions of each tale, asking questions such as: why do certain tales persist in popular culture, and what is the significance of the continual revisioning of familiar tales and motifs? What is the relationship between the mode or genre of the tale and its meaning? Themes of violence, adolescence, and maturation are examined, side by side with critical essays by scholars working from literary-critical, feminist, and psychological viewpoints. Authors include the Brothers Grimm, Charles Perrault, Nalo Hopkinson, and Angela Carter, among others. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 1
    (May 24-June 30)

    A1 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 10 am-12:30 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: YAW 322

    Amy Bennett-Zendzian

    Topic: Revisiting Fairly Tales. Ell students only

    Topic: Revisiting Fairly Tales. Ell students only

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Storytelling. All people tell stories, and these stories reflect, challenge, and affirm who we are and the culture in which we live. Students examine the necessity of storytelling, identifying key narrative structures and devices while exploring a range of literary and digital texts in light of these narrative conventions and human imperatives. The seminar considers the purpose and effect of our personal stories, comparing versions and extensions of fairy tales, and considering the reciprocal relationship between stories, culture, and power. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 1
    (May 24-June 30)

    A2 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 10 am-12:30 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: CAS 323B

    Carroll Beauvais

    Topic: Storytelling

    Topic: Storytelling

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Short Fiction. Muriel Ruykeyser said: “The world is made of stories, not of atoms.” Using Ruykeyser's quote as a guide, students examine the world through the lens of short fiction and consider the following questions: Does literature reflect or direct society? What insights can people glean about a culture or period from reading? What choices do writers make, and what is the effect of different styles or techniques of writing? Students look to answer these questions through several great American short stories including Ernest Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants,” Flannery O’Conner’s “A Good Man is Hard to Find,” and Truman Capote’s “Miriam.” 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 1
    (May 24-June 30)

    A3 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 1:30-4 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: YAW 322

    Kimberly Shuckra-Gomez

    Topic: Short Fiction. Ell students only

    Topic: Short Fiction. Ell students only

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Resistance and Revolution. In today’s culture of political division and widespread injustice, it is fair to ask what the role of art is in the face of such turmoil. This seminar investigates the role of artistic creations in times of political crisis and looks at how art can be employed as protest and to promote social justice. Students look at literature and the arts from a global perspective and uncover parallels between contemporary problems and historical events, including the Civil War, the Civil Rights movement, and contemporary struggles for equal rights in our current political climate. Readings include works by Walt Whitman, Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Sharon Olds, and Yesenia Montilla. Those readings are contextualized through other media such as visual arts (Picasso, graffiti, the viral video) and essays (by José Martí, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Zora Neale Hurston, and George Orwell). 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 1
    (May 24-June 30)

    A4 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 1:30-4 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: CAS 212

    Christopher Eldrett

    Topic: Resistance and Revolution

    Topic: Resistance and Revolution

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Inventing the American Individualist. “Nothing is at last sacred but the integrity of your own mind.” So wrote Ralph Waldo Emerson, expressing a sentiment that seems native to the American character. From mountain men to entrepreneurs, from pioneers to beatniks, from suffragettes to senators, Americans have identified with roles that are individualistic, independent, and self-reliant. This seminar investigates the degree to which this attitude is rooted and reflected in our literary tradition. Readings include Thoreau’s “Civil Disobedience,” Ginsburg’s “Howl,” and Twain’s Huckleberry Finn. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 1
    (May 24-June 30)

    A5 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 6-8:30 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: YAW 322

    Thomas Villano

    Topic: Inventing the American Individualist

    Topic: Inventing the American Individualist

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Travel Writing: The Literary Pilgrimage. Why do we travel? For adventure, luxury, or social status? To learn, to rest, or to be transported? While some people travel for comfort, rest, or simply to escape the mundane, most of us acknowledge that traveling requires work, commitment, and energy. So why do we put ourselves through it? For many of us who consider ourselves “travelers,” wanderlust beckons and we cannot refuse its siren call. In this course, students explore travel not just as an adventure to report, but as a lens through which we can examine our lives. Students read Edith Wharton, Paul Theroux, Pico Iyer, Paul Bowles, W.G. Sebald, Bill Bryson, Jodie Noel Vinson, and Jan Morris. In addition to more traditional academic papers, students write a journalistic piece—a travel essay that incorporates elements of the literary pilgrimage—for which they write a pitch to a travel magazine or journal. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 2
    (July 5-August 11)

    B1 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 10 am-12:30 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: YAW 322

    Jenai Engelhard Humphreys

    Topic: Travel Writing: The Literary Pilgrimage

    Topic: Travel Writing: The Literary Pilgrimage

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  • First-Year Writing Seminar

    CAS WR 120

    Topic: Communicating Science. How does information change and evolve as it is communicated to different audiences and through different media? This seminar focuses on how highly specialized scientific information is presented to and interpreted by a general audience that does not have technical knowledge. By examining press releases, news articles, government guidelines, native advertising, and social media, students explore how scientific information about different subjects is disseminated to the US public and uncover what it takes to be scientifically literate in a twenty-first-century world. Course texts include scholarly works by authors such as Michael Pollen and Mariam Nestle and a variety of traditional and multimodal sources, such as blogs, podcasts, and even pop songs. 4 cr. Tuition: $3020

    Summer 2
    (July 5-August 11)

    B2 (IND) Mon./Tues./Thurs. 1:30-4 pm Add & Drop Dates

    … Open Seats

    Location: YAW 322

    Michele Calandra

    Topic: Communicating Science. Ell students only

    Topic: Communicating Science. Ell students only

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